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    • By anilv
      Hi guys,
      Thought I'd share some pics of my Oris Big crown with pointer-date (circa 2009?).
      Simple classic design and quite in the spirit of the older Oris watches.

      The case back gives a good view of the ETA2836 inside. The red rotor was a Oris touch. The edge of the caseback has a coin-edged design, similar to the front of the watch. This improves the look of the caseback as the metal edge would look too big otherwise. Increasing the display window wouldn't work I think as that would only show the movement holding ring.

      The line is still pretty decent..

      And the bracelet is nice and supple.

      But the design of the clasp is a bit plain.

      Oris deserves credit as it was one of the brands which was instrumental in bringing back the Swiss watch industry back from brink of the abyss. In the late. 80s and early nineties, their classically designed watches using ETA movements sold well by focussing on the mechanical movements and using it as their USP. Their tag-line at the time was 'high-much', as seen on the rotor in the movement pic above.
      This watch came my way as a part exchange for an Omega Constellation. The previous owner had gotten the Swiss watch bug but as he got deeper into the hobby he started to appreciate other brands. To be specific, he was  getting into the 'manufacturer' brands as opposed to 'ebauche' brands. It's a shame as this watch is quite good as it is. Ah well, the previous owner should be into Pateks by now!.
      Anilv
       
    • By mjtaven
      Can't stop wearing it !

    • By Ajayel
      Yesterday my Oris watch hit a tiled floor when the strap pin broke and the back crystal popped off. Being in a rush , I quickly pressed it back into position and left it for later investigation.

      Today the crystal seems to be fixed in position, but I have no experience of removing or replacing these. Was a simple press of the thumb strong enough to do the job? How can I check, other then testing with my thumb nail. Are these a simple pop on fixing?
       
      Many thanks.
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    • I have a nice big concrete block outside. I feel like taking this POS, putting it on that block  and pounding the shit out of it until its a nice homogeneous, flat piece of metal.
    • What the problem here is for your question is Mark's video is confusing. Normally when you do a balance staff you would statically poise first then sometimes dynamically poise. If your dynamic poising you use eight pendant positions usually. So in his video he comments for this particular watch he is dynamic poising. Then adjusting to positions is an interesting term or as your question is which positions should you worry about timekeeping in? Basically what you're doing by timing the watch on the timing machine in a variety of positions is your verifying the watch does keep time in those positions.  So for pocket watches dial up and crown up are the most common. For wristwatches I'm attaching what Omega recommends for their watches
    • check each as old hippy said but end shakes on a 3rd wheel allow a lot more play than lets say a balance or escape. you can get away with too much end shake and not loose much amplitude, too little will def not work though and will def result in a very low amp and or stop the movement. train wheels being loose is always better than too tight in my opinion
    • its farfo.com dont put the www. or just google farfo vintage watches ridgewood nj. archer is a memeber on teh Watchuseek forums and is very good esp when it comes to high end watches like omega. he is a certified omega repairer, not many of those around. he uses the same equipment they uses at the omega facilities. 100,000s worth of equipment
    • Try winding through the ratchet wheel, put screwdriver in the wheels slot,turn to wind , should wind full.
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