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    • By anilv
      Hi guys,
      Thought I'd share some pics of my Oris Big crown with pointer-date (circa 2009?).
      Simple classic design and quite in the spirit of the older Oris watches.

      The case back gives a good view of the ETA2836 inside. The red rotor was a Oris touch. The edge of the caseback has a coin-edged design, similar to the front of the watch. This improves the look of the caseback as the metal edge would look too big otherwise. Increasing the display window wouldn't work I think as that would only show the movement holding ring.

      The line is still pretty decent..

      And the bracelet is nice and supple.

      But the design of the clasp is a bit plain.

      Oris deserves credit as it was one of the brands which was instrumental in bringing back the Swiss watch industry back from brink of the abyss. In the late. 80s and early nineties, their classically designed watches using ETA movements sold well by focussing on the mechanical movements and using it as their USP. Their tag-line at the time was 'high-much', as seen on the rotor in the movement pic above.
      This watch came my way as a part exchange for an Omega Constellation. The previous owner had gotten the Swiss watch bug but as he got deeper into the hobby he started to appreciate other brands. To be specific, he was  getting into the 'manufacturer' brands as opposed to 'ebauche' brands. It's a shame as this watch is quite good as it is. Ah well, the previous owner should be into Pateks by now!.
      Anilv
       
    • By mjtaven
      Can't stop wearing it !

    • By Ajayel
      Yesterday my Oris watch hit a tiled floor when the strap pin broke and the back crystal popped off. Being in a rush , I quickly pressed it back into position and left it for later investigation.

      Today the crystal seems to be fixed in position, but I have no experience of removing or replacing these. Was a simple press of the thumb strong enough to do the job? How can I check, other then testing with my thumb nail. Are these a simple pop on fixing?
       
      Many thanks.
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    • Welcome Dan  I too have many hobbies but love the watch and clock aspects but flyfish when time and weather allow plus fly tying , gardening and Diy  plenty to do
    • Hi Dan, Welcome to the forum.
    • A soak in diesel fuel, naphta for day or two,  ends the old story of heads popping off the screws. I remove balance cock pallets and soak the rest, give one dip in a fluid I can stand the odor of. Any cheap multipurpose oil would do. I use several solutions, detergent seperately and brush extesively.  
    • Hello forum folks, I've been tinkering with watches for maybe 5 years now. I'm very much a beginner but I have been practicing on cheap watches and movements that it is ok to break. I've managed to make my own watch dial from a brass sheet, including brushing, rhodium plating, printing, and creating applied markers and numerals. I've also made a "smart" watch using epoxy-based putty for the case and my electronics knowledge. I have some basic skills in metal finishing including polishing and plating. So I've mostly worked on the non-movement aspects of watchmaking and am interested into learning about servicing movements. I live in the Milwaukee area and was thrilled to see MATC (local trade school) on lists of schools that teach watchmaking -- just to have that dashed when I contacted them and the class has been discontinued for lack of interest  So for now, I have online and book resources to learn. I have a mostly cheap watch collection other than a Longines that I treasure. I have a few different old timex mechanicals I got off of ebay, including 2 from JerseyMo which I saw is on this forum. I have have way more hobbies than time so I'll probably be around off and on. Dan
    • First thing would be to remove the pinions. They are sometimes quite well rivetted, so this may involve turning away some of the rivet or being willing to sacrifice the wheel (it could easily be distorted beyond use in punching the pinion out). Then you need to compare the hole in the wheel you want to use to the diameter on the pinion that will be pressed and rivetted in. If too big it gets tricky, you'll need to sleeve/bush the hole very securely. I would open the hole further, then chamfer both sides, make the bush with an undersized hole, then fit it in. Swage the bush with a convex punch in the hole from both sides, then a flat punch that is larger than the bush. The idea is to deform metal into the two chamfers on the wheel. Finally flatten and clean up. Now open the hole to receive the pinion. If the hole is too small it's easy, just open it up and press/rivett the pinion in.
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