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    • By anilv
      Hi guys,
      Thought I'd share some pics of my Oris Big crown with pointer-date (circa 2009?).
      Simple classic design and quite in the spirit of the older Oris watches.

      The case back gives a good view of the ETA2836 inside. The red rotor was a Oris touch. The edge of the caseback has a coin-edged design, similar to the front of the watch. This improves the look of the caseback as the metal edge would look too big otherwise. Increasing the display window wouldn't work I think as that would only show the movement holding ring.

      The line is still pretty decent..

      And the bracelet is nice and supple.

      But the design of the clasp is a bit plain.

      Oris deserves credit as it was one of the brands which was instrumental in bringing back the Swiss watch industry back from brink of the abyss. In the late. 80s and early nineties, their classically designed watches using ETA movements sold well by focussing on the mechanical movements and using it as their USP. Their tag-line at the time was 'high-much', as seen on the rotor in the movement pic above.
      This watch came my way as a part exchange for an Omega Constellation. The previous owner had gotten the Swiss watch bug but as he got deeper into the hobby he started to appreciate other brands. To be specific, he was  getting into the 'manufacturer' brands as opposed to 'ebauche' brands. It's a shame as this watch is quite good as it is. Ah well, the previous owner should be into Pateks by now!.
      Anilv
       
    • By mjtaven
      Can't stop wearing it !

    • By Ajayel
      Yesterday my Oris watch hit a tiled floor when the strap pin broke and the back crystal popped off. Being in a rush , I quickly pressed it back into position and left it for later investigation.

      Today the crystal seems to be fixed in position, but I have no experience of removing or replacing these. Was a simple press of the thumb strong enough to do the job? How can I check, other then testing with my thumb nail. Are these a simple pop on fixing?
       
      Many thanks.
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    • Yes I considered that, i would pick up one which has no shelves or drawers at the bottom, most of them have them.
    • Make sure you have plenty of leg room. You could be sat there for hours so you do not want to be cramped up. 
    • good show,  you did good by not removing the balance till the main spring was let down.  "no pallets in this design!"   a watch "with pallets"  it is proper to remove the ballance before spring let down.   keep up the good work.   vin
    • Hi fellow Clockmakers, Would a bureau desk work as a clock/watchmaker desk? Not high enough (could be solved) or stable enough? I could fetch one of these from facebook around 30-40 pounds. I like the idea because it would be more or less child and dustproof as you can close and lock the whole thing. Best regards, lui
    • I have a monoprice voxel. It is limited in features compared to others but works out-of-the-box and was a good price. I wouldn't bother with a 3d printer for parts holders and the like. There are a few nice designs on thingiverse but really it isn't worth the bother. Injection molded supplies are going to be better quality and you can buy a bunch all at once instead of one waiting to print them out one at a time. Where it may come in handy is when you need something in a specific shape that you cannot buy. But keep in mind you will need to learn at least some basic CAD design. I use Moi3d which is excellent but there are cheaper alternatives. I've used my 3d printer to create different adapters and holders where I needed an exact shape. For example, I was bending a strip of brass and was able to create plastic bending clamps I compressed with some pliers. I was able to figure out the exact inside and outside curve I needed and print to match. The nice thing about the 3d printed parts is you can use glue to attach whatever you need to it without worrying about having to damage the print when removing it as you can always print a new one.
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