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Help ordering the right Bergeon mainspring winder


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23 minutes ago, PeterS said:

 If I have this correct, you will need the right hand ones for Swiss watches and the left hand winders for watches like Seiko.

Why getting left and right, in case the wise is incorrect all one has to do is transfer in a roundel and flip it.

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22 minutes ago, jdm said:

Why getting left and right, in case the wise is incorrect all one has to do is transfer in a roundel and flip it.

I didn’t realise you could flip it. In that case the more basic set would be good enough, buying additional sizes if required.

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1 hour ago, jdm said:

Why getting left and right, in case the wise is incorrect all one has to do is transfer in a roundel and flip it.

This definitely sounds like the obvious thing to do and would save a lot of money, but where can we get the roundels? Searching eBay for "mainspring roundels" didn't come up with anything. So far I only have roundels for my three Unitas 6497/6498 movements which I got when I bought spares from Cousins. I guess I could buy spare mainsprings having the right diameter but the diameter info doesn't seem to be available (springs and barrels). I would assume experienced watch repairers to have "a ton" of them!?

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8 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

This definitely sounds like the obvious thing to do and would save a lot of money, but where can we get the roundels?

At the hardware store. And then drill to make of the right inner diameter. Or drill any metal piece that you like. It doesn't even need to be round outside, or the very exact diameter inside. Just a little bit smaller than the destination barrel.

Ingenuity beats big budgets and extensive tools sets, every single time. 

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2 minutes ago, jdm said:

At the hardware store. And then drill to make of the right inner diameter. Or drill any metal piece that you like.

Ingenuity beats big budgets and extensive tools sets, every single time. 

When can I borrow your metal drill and other required equipment? ;)

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Just now, VWatchie said:

When can I borrow your metal drill and other required equipment? ;)

You don't need a "metal drill" just an home use one. They start at euro 20? Drill bits are 1 or 2 euro each. Or use use a round file and develop manual skills. If you don't have these tools at home get them and I guarantee they will do good for watches and everything else at home.

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6 minutes ago, jdm said:

You don't need a "metal drill" just an home use one. They start at euro 20? Drill bits are 1 or 2 euro each. Or use use a round file and develop manual skills. If you don't have these tools at home get them and I guarantee they will do good for watches and everything else at home.

3

Thanks, I'll consider it an option! I would, of course, need a steady vice too, but I would assume they aren't that expensive. I'll look into it.

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5 hours ago, VWatchie said:

I realise my question wasn't adequately formulated, and I apologise for that. I'm a hobbyist and I'm still new to watch repairing (love it!) as I've only been doing it for a year or so, but the passion for watches and the fascination for measuring time I've had since I was a kid.

Never apologize for asking a question we are all learning here.

Did you notice when you read through all the answers that there were no absolutes? It's the problem with watch repair even if you had all the tools above they may not be adequate for every single situation. Which is not entirely a helpful answer for your question.

So if money is no object definitely buy it. The problem with starting watch repair is/and for all of us it's expensive to acquire every single tool so this usually means you have to compromise with, what do I need now to solve the problem. Or just really lucky purchases over time.

So if you're doing modern Swiss wristwatches you may not need a mainspring Winder at all because you purchase a new spring shove it in and that's the end of it. But either because you can't conveniently get a spring or the old spring looks acceptable then having some way to get it in other than the struggle of winding it in by hand would be nice.

Then before I spiral off into the mystery of winders from Bergeon You might want to look at the basic set 2729 Right handles only.

Then the other option is individuals but that brings up a problem and a mystery. To understand the mystery the first link is nice because everything is pictured you can see the numbers the descriptions and there's a second page. So all the bits and pieces are there all 17 sizes individually can be purchased plus additional ones specifically for ETA and Rolex. There is even a set specific for ETA and because they have specific part numbers I'm assuming that they're not the same as what's found in the standard set there's a difference somehow. Then a Winder for your Swiss pocket watch I assume you mean the older version that runs at 18,000 because there are two specific winders to correspond to the two versions of this watch.

 

http://www.julesborel.com/products/tools-mainspring-tools-mainspring-winders

http://www.julesborel.com/products/tools-mainspring-tools-mainspring-winders/bergeon-2795-eta-assortment-of-12-mainspring-winders-for-calibre-eta

http://www.julesborel.com/products/tools-mainspring-tools-mainspring-winders/bergeon-mainspring-winder-eta6497-98-2

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/watch-bergeon-2795eta

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3 hours ago, VWatchie said:

This definitely sounds like the obvious thing to do and would save a lot of money, but where can we get the roundels? Searching eBay for "mainspring roundels" didn't come up with anything. So far I only have roundels for my three Unitas 6497/6498 movements which I got when I bought spares from Cousins. I guess I could buy spare mainsprings having the right diameter but the diameter info doesn't seem to be available (springs and barrels). I would assume experienced watch repairers to have "a ton" of them!?

To help clarify a little, the roundels that @jdm refers to might also be called washers, the sort that would you find with the nuts and bolts and other fixings at an iron mongers or hardware store.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On ‎6‎/‎24‎/‎2018 at 8:47 PM, clockboy said:

I have the Bergeon Winder 1/2 set but had to modify it to work. i found the hole that accepts the spring when winding galas too small. However if you see a Master craft winder I recommend you purchase.  See pics to see how it works.\

A set is now on auction on eBay! Despite your illustrations I really can't say that I fully understand how it works. Nevertheless, I'm sure I'd be able to figure it out (I have an idea). Anyway, what I don't understand is if these winders are variable or fixed in diameter? If fixed, what are the sizes? Sorry if my questions seem uninitiated. :unsure: As I've already stated, I'm still pretty new to this. Thanks!!!

Oh BTW, what would be a fair price?

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  • 2 years later...
On 6/14/2018 at 12:20 PM, VWatchie said:

Indeed! A surprisingly educational and clarifying illustration! Thank you very much!

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/876/42080422644_b9dc757f4e_o.gif

So, we now know that when buying a Bergeon mainspring winder, the specified diameter is the outer diameter of the winder's drum. Brilliant! :thumbsu:

https://blog.esslinger.com/how-to-wind-a-mainspring-with-the-bergeon-mainspring-winders/

Thank you all for posting this information. Above find a link to some more info on this.  I know it's been a while for this board. I hope it's okay that I post something I came across, relating to this topic. It gives a pretty clear illustration, which I also like for reference as a la old school manual as opposed to video which can be hard to follow if not well done and not always clear. Many I'm sure know of this company but for those who don't, Esslinger, has a lot of useful written and video tutorials such as this on their website to go along with the products the offer, I just stumbled on them, and haven't read anyone mention in a forum so I thought I would in case it's helpful in any small way. Disclaimer -  I have  no relationship with Esslinger, I'm just a customer but FYI  I've also found them to be super nice, responsive to customers for orders or just info about stuff. Best. 

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