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Hi to you all,

I was wondering, if you use a regular ultrasonic instead of a watch cleaning machine. How would you rinse your parts? And how many times? In which solutions?

I always cleaned my parts in the ultra sonic with a solution and rinsed the parts in benzine( that's the way an old watchmaker learned me) but i've found out that very often this does not give me the results i was hoping for. Can I perhaps get little jars with a rinse solution and run those in the ultra sonic? 

thanks! 

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This my cause outrage with the purists out there, "i'm sorry if it does"

I use a ultrasonic cleaner with a recipe that was given to me by an old watch repair guy. He thought the really expensive  cleaner & rinse solutions were  a waste of money. 

Because I clean perhaps one or two pocket watches each month, i agree.

I cleaned a Hampden 18s P/W today with my solution and it was really dirty being 100 years old, and all. It turned out great as usual. I rinse with alcohol

Do you agree?

20180523_141656 (Medium).jpg

20180523_141707 (Medium).jpg

Edited by TimFitz
missed something

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I read on another watch site that horoclean is a rip off. The main contents supposedly being stoddards (white spirit), naptha (high grade zippo fuel) and about 2% acid (don’t recall which one) to help lightly pickle tarnish from the surface. Any comments on the validity of this concoction please? I tried mixing naptha, white spirit and methylated spirits in equal volumes. The results were not bad. I dip rinsed in pure zippo lighter fluid before letting dry on parcel tissue. No marks remained.


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This my cause outrage with the purists out there, "i'm sorry if it does"
I use a ultrasonic cleaner with a recipe that was given to me by an old watch repair guy. He thought the really expensive  cleaner & rinse solutions were  a waste of money. 
Because I clean perhaps one or two pocket watches each month, i agree.
I cleaned a Hampden 18s P/W today with my solution and it was really dirty being 100 years old, and all. It turned out great as usual. I rinse with alcohol
Do you agree?
5b05b4e622cd0_20180523_141656(Medium).thumb.jpg.6a8ef9406baf86574ee2dd51afc055d9.jpg
5b05b4fb045fb_20180523_141707(Medium).thumb.jpg.483b41f0048e62d27bc8769bca21608e.jpg

They look beautifully clean! A wonderfully crafted watch. I just love the ‘engining’ machine marks too.


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Here is what I Use

1. Empty 1gal. jug

2. 1/2 gal.of distilled  water

3. add 6 ounces of industrial ammonia 

4. 2 1/2 oz. Murphy's Oil soap

5. 1/2 oz. cascade dish washer soap.

Mix well

I won't go into what is in these products that mimics what is in the chemicals they sell at the watch repair places. For one I don't remember , second , I don't want to be scolded for getting them wrong.

 I put them in my ultrasonic cleaner, ( except for balance wheel & the pallet assembly) because of the jewels) , run a cycle , take the parts & use a soft tooth brush to give them a good brushing. Then cycle them through an ultrasonic cleaner. (again if necessary)

 I then take the parts out and rinse withe distilled water. Then dry them good. Then put them in alcohol to get rid of any water. Then I rinse them in another alcohol bath, then let then dry. I put them on a clean cloth on a homemade warmer made from a light bulb

If you use this you use it at your own risk!! I first tried it a few years ago on movement that I was willing to sacrifice. It did no damage & I am still wearing  this watch.

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If you heat your final rinse if distilled water to about 170 F and soak the parts for a minute, they will “flash dry” when they come out and you shouldn’t need all the alcohol rinses. 

This assumes the parts are not distorted by 170 degrees of course. 

We process a lot of jet engine compressor blades and the last step of our nitric acid strip process is the hot (tap) water rinse so the parts flash dry without spotting. 

Distilled (deionized is probably better) water is better with fewer impurities in it than the tap water we use. Some of the blades are pretty rough when they come in so it’s less of a concern for us. 

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