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    • By Misshollypocket
      I actually have a couple problems I could use some help with. I’ll start with the more serious one I guess. I don’t have any trouble getting the back off my watches or changing the battery, but every time I use my tool to snap the back back on, something happens to the crown pin. It just lets go and comes out. I thought it was a strange occurrence the first time but I tried another one this week and got the same results. I’ve done this same thing on hundreds of other watches of different types and brands but never ran into this problem before. Can someone please help me figure out what I’m doing wrong?
      Also, a couple of my watches don’t seem to be able to adjust to my teeny tiny wrist size. In my Monarch, the majority of the links don’t have holes to remove the pins. Is there any other way to remove a couple links. Any advice would be appreciated immensely!!!
    • By JJM
      Is this a rubber 'O' ring in here? 
      Not too sure how to approach replacing this.... 
      Or do I just hit it with my chequebook? 
    • By MrRoundel
      Greetings all. I think I may have made a mistake in buying a GP watch that has the 641-875 quartz movement in it. It's a nice looking watch, with a very solid case, but I didn't find out about the caliber number until after I bought it. The seller did not have an image of the movement. Since I usually like GP movements, I thought it was worth a little gamble on getting it running, even if I had to clean it. After the auction ended I found out about these GP quartz movements that are impossible to get parts for, and that the dead ones usually need a circuit that is made of unobtainium.
      Since the watch had an old battery (Union Carbide brand) in it I figured that I might get lucky and get it running with a fresh battery. I wasn't counting on that happening since the guy who sold it was a watch guy. It would be hard to believe that he didn't at least try a new battery in there. Anyway, it didn't get it running.
      Does anyone know about these rather interesting old quartz movements? I believe it is from the late seventies perhaps? Is there any use in seeing if one of those quartz movement "spinners" could free things up? Unfortunately, it's not like GP provides technical info the way a company like ETA does, so if I take it apart I'll have to take a lot of images as I do. Anyway, any help on this is appreciated. Thanks ahead of time. Stay healthy, all. Cheers.

    • By Trevelyan
      Hi, new to repairing, just getting my feet wet, so be prepared for me to use incorrect language, and have things explained like I'm 5 :)
      A couple years ago, I purchased a Seiko Sportsmatic Weekdater, cal. 6619-7050. 
      Soon after purchase, the crown detached from the stem, and I took it in to local watchmaker for repair. It was returned in apparently good shape, but actually the problem still exists. 
      I'd like to learn how to fix the problem, and hopefully bring this watch back to my wrist. 
      It appears that the crown screws onto the stem, but that is as far as I have got. 
      Any assistance would be welcomed. I did find a service manual elsewhere, but I'm a bit lost as it's my first. 


      Seiko Sportmatic 6619A.pdf
    • By jbirkrepair
      Hi, I recently purchased a Seiko GMT Perpetual off eBay. The watch has a 8f56 Movement which is the high accuracy quartz movement. 
      The watch was purchased with a low battery (indicated by the second hand ticking every 5 seconds).
      I've since replaced the battery and reset the perpetual calendar, the watch was working for about 3 hours and then just stopped. I've since tried to reset the perpetual calendar again and it doesn't do anything just completely dead. 
      I recently went to a local watch repair shop and they said it would need a entirely new movement and would set me back £250 for it. It would however be done by Seiko not themselves. 
      Any help is much appreciated.

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    • I promise this is not another thread about what to use! I have read the pinned thread on this twice and I'm satisfied with my lighter fluid (until it runs out) and IPA combination. Just a quick question about storage and precautions as this is the first time I used IPA. The label of the IPA 99% gives all sorts of warnings. I fully understand it's a volatile substance.. is it any more volatile than the lighter fluid ive been using up to now?  I currently use in a cool, dark, ventilated part of my garage, I wear gloves and keep the water in the US cold.  The fluids are stored either in the original container or in the little jam jars with lids. Then in a box in the garage.  Anything I should be more careful of/havent considered?
    • Many autos are actually based on manual calibers that have heavily modified bridges to accommodate the requirements of a bolt on auto module. If you look closely at some of the AS manual winders for instance you will notice that there are a lot of odd holes in the main plates and even in some of the bridges that don't seem to serve any purpose. Some of these are to make the main plate common to both calendar and non-calendar variants, and I would be surprised if some of them weren't for auto module functions. In fact if you look at Ranfft you will see in a number of database entries the whole movement family is listed, usually starting with the base manual movement, and progressing with the addition of complications. I might therefore be possible to start with a manual winder that is part of a whole family of movements which includes autos and swap out all of the different parts to make it an auto, but the cost would be out of all proportion to simply buying the auto movement in the first place, and then it would be unlikely to fit in the case that the original manual winder came from, requiring a new case to be sourced as well. So theoretically possible, but why would you do that? Converting a manual caliber that has no auto DNA included as standard is also feasible. Cimier has managed to add auto winding to the venerable Unitas/ETA 6497, a classic manual winder, have a look here. In fact a lot of the early autos were just that, but it's only possible if you have the design and manufacturing capability to devise and make the relevant parts.
    • Is the rotor original? Could it of been fitted with a new rotor at some point that has the wrong jewel count on it?
    • Isn't the impulse jewel common to both movements? Since the "C" has a jewelled barrel arbor hole which isn't jewelled on the "B", in order for the jewel count to be correct for both movements the "B" must have a jewelled bearing that is not jewelled on the "C". It would be interesting to see what aspect of the "C" was improved by removing a jewel, even if it just turns out to be the cost of manufacture.
    • Awww. Mine are definitely much better JDR. . To be honest I don’t know, but that’s certainly an enviable display of screwdrivers. The grips aside, the main improvement I found was the precision ground stainless steel blade. Nice display box! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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