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I’m working myself through Mark Lovic’s “Watch Repair Lessons & Courses”. Before enrolling I wasn’t sure the courses would be worthwhile to me, as I had spent a huge amount of time researching the Internet on how to service watches, and had serviced several Vostok 24XX movements (very affordable movements, BTW).

Now, in hindsight, the courses have proved to be extremely valuable to me. I’ve learned things that I just haven’t been able to find elsewhere, like how to easily transfer watch oil from the bottles to the oil pots, how the get the right amount of oil onto the escape wheel teeth, how to remove rust from pinion leaves, that I shouldn’t oil the pallet fork jewel bearings (and why!). The list could be made very long.

Anyway, yesterday I finished the level 2 section of the course, named “Lubrication and Re-Assembly”, and as I beheld the magic of seeing the movement come to life again I shoot a slow-motion video of its beating heart, i.e. the balance wheel. For anyone interested you can see the video here.

Thanks for reading!

Edited by VWatchie
Just trying to improve readability

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13 minutes ago, VWatchie said:

I’m working myself through Mark Lovic’s “Watch Repair Lessons & Courses”. Before enrolling I wasn’t sure the courses would be worthwhile to me, as I had spent a huge amount of time researching the Internet on how to service watches, and had serviced several Vostok 24XX movements (very affordable movements, BTW).

Now, in hindsight, the courses have proved to be extremely valuable to me. I’ve learned things that I just haven’t been able to find elsewhere, like how to easily transfer watch oil from the bottles to the oil pots, how the get the right amount of oil onto the escape wheel teeth, how to remove rust from pinion leaves, that I shouldn’t oil the pallet fork jewel bearings (and why!). The list could be made very long.

Anyway, yesterday I finished the level 2 section of the course, named “Lubrication and Re-Assembly”, and as I beheld the magic of seeing the movement come to life again I shoot a slow-motion video of its beating heart, i.e. the balance wheel. For anyone interested you can see the video here.

Thanks for reading!

Yes Mark got me hooked a few years ago. Mind you it has cost a fortune in tools !!!!:D

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Just now, clockboy said:

Yes Mark got me hooked a few years ago. Mind you it has cost a fortune in tools !!!!:D

Yes, tell me all about it!  But, compared to people into hi-fi, cars, etc., I'm thinking I'm saving a lot of money! ;)

For example; my latest investment was in a set of Bergeon egonomic watch oilers, and although silly expensive, I really find them superior and so much easier to use than any of my other oilers.

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On 12/05/2018 at 11:17 AM, VWatchie said:

Yes, tell me all about it!  But, compared to people into hi-fi, cars, etc., I'm thinking I'm saving a lot of money! ;)

For example; my latest investment was in a set of Bergeon egonomic watch oilers, and although silly expensive, I really find them superior and so much easier to use than any of my other oilers.

There's the rub I'm into hi- fi as well. :)

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But, unless you are DJ’ing with your hi-fi or fixing up your classic car for resale, the watchmaking hobby is financially rewarding if you so choose.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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That’s nice to know. You can never stop learning. The internet was not around when I was an apprentice. I learned from my master. It just goes to show I’m an old fart. I enjoy the forum so much in helping others with knowledge that I have gained over the years.  

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I was looking at my hi-fi, started thinking about mainspring winders, timing machine and others I will need and thought the hi-fi was a bargain.

As for the course, it’s really good. I have bought some books previously, watched videos etc. but never had full understanding of the basic stuff how everything works until now.
I’m looking forward to Level 3

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That’s nice to know. You can never stop learning. The internet was not around when I was an apprentice. I learned from my master. It just goes to show I’m an old fart. I enjoy the forum so much in helping others with knowledge that I have gained over the years.  


Thanks for your contribution to others@oldhippy it’s appreciated.


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On 5/12/2018 at 1:06 PM, oldhippy said:

That’s nice to know. You can never stop learning. The internet was not around when I was an apprentice. I learned from my master. It just goes to show I’m an old fart. I enjoy the forum so much in helping others with knowledge that I have gained over the years.  

 

I would`nt mind betting that you have a fair bit of it tucked away as well, old hippy !!.

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