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PeterS

Unitas 6497 shock spring replacement

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1 hour ago, rodabod said:

Do you have access to a diamond lap (stone) or an India oilstone?

I don’t I’m afraid.
I’m not too worried to be honest, I bought this movement to follow the course so it’s not a big problem.

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20 hours ago, PeterS said:

I don’t I’m afraid.
I’m not too worried to be honest, I bought this movement to follow the course so it’s not a big problem.

 

Well, you are going to need one at some point! Very handy for finishing the ends of stems, etc. 

See attached photo: you could stone the edges of the spring hinge equally on each sides (count the number of strokes). It would need to be very gradual so that it only just fits when pushed into the incabloc setting. 

Alternatively, just a get another Chinese movement, but it seems a bit of a waste of money, especially because the replacement spring will also be an excessively loose fit due to their design. 

DAF0C26A-4B36-4C65-B9F8-9B3719977E66.png

Edited by rodabod

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On 18/05/2018 at 10:04 AM, PeterS said:

I am up for it, I like a challenge. I’ll look for the stones, I’m sure that won’t be a problem to find but how do I hold the spring so I can file it?

 

Look for a cheap-y diamond lap on eBay. You can even get a small one for sharpening fishing hooks for around £1. 

Holding the work will be a challenge. You’ll possibly have to hold firmly in tweezers and maintain a good angle. You would be removing the most minute amount; just enough to be able to force it in. 

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Another option might be to hold the spring flat on something soft like cork. You could then use a fine needle file (or diamond lap again) to stroke the sides of the spring by pushing the file or lap slightly into the cork as you draw it along the side of the spring. 

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Actually, I have some stones for sharpening knives. Several grades up to mirror finish.
I’ll have to give it a go one evening.

There are three possibilities why it doesn’t fit, I think I’ll only be able to do it if it is the option ‘1’ as per my picture.

ShockSpring.jpg

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I managed to file the hinge, put it in the slot, turned it 90 degrees and it wouldn’t go down. Stands upright, looks perfect but will not move/close.

I’m going to call it a day. It’s annoying but the movement is good for stripping it down, lubrication and re-assembly, I don't need it for anything else.

If I exaggerate, I think this is where the difference is:

SwissVClone.jpg

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Well, you can be glad that you’ve already attempted some relatively advanced watch repair. I’ve seen some experienced watchmakers struggle with these incabloc settings. Keep an eye out for Chinese spares. 

Later on, you may be able to replace the entire incabloc setting with a jewelling tool. That’s for a later date though!

 

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It was frustrating and I spent over two hours messing around with it.
However, my hand coordination certainly improved and if I had the correct spring I would fit it in with no problems now.

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Here's the solution I used, though not a perfect one it did the job. I used the standard Incabloc spring made for the LOWER setting. It fits because it has the correctly shaped longer neck.

To install it I held it in a flat nose tweezers at an angle to the slot, lowered the spring into the slot, then turned the movement to align the spring with the slot and carefully lowered it down . Then used a pegwood to push it forward all the way towards the jewel. Then using the pegwood to prevent the spring from sliding back I engaged the ends, one at a time. Then again using pegwood (or a small screwdriver?) I made sure the spring is pushed all the way forward.

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15 hours ago, PeterS said:

Do you mean I can take the spring from the lower shock, fit it in the upper shock and use the Chinese one for the lower shock?

 

I wouldn't try that if I was you!

As you have already found out, the Chinese springs are made from poor quality metal and break just by breathing on them.

Would you rather have two broken springs, rather than one?!

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