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    • By Matthew
      Good (insert time here) everyone!
           I am relatively new to the world of clockwork repair and maintenence, but have done delicate metalwork, mechanism cleaning, and enjoy fixing things. Just recently, my sister brought home her boyfriends late great grandmothers singing bird in cage automata. For those of you who dont completely know or understand what it is, its basically a spring driven mechanism using bellows and a variable organ pipe to make bird sounds and move a little birdie around and "sing" (Example of singing bird mechanism working).
           His aunt wants it to be operational again, and after opening it up (not yet taking much apart) I have come to the conclusion that it could just use a good cleaning and oiling. But, my question is, what kind of oil should I use and how should I apply it? I don't have any fancy oils except for a bottle of valve oil for my trumpet at my current disposal, but I would like to buy some decent clockwork oil for this project and a sankyo music box repair I have waiting. 
       
           Note: come to find out while writing this, it was made by eschle reuge I'm Germany, probably around the 50's or 40's.







    • By maclerche
      When I look at watchmaker workbenches i see that it is performed in many different shapes and designs. I would like to see and hear about your experience with watchmaking Workbenches. What to prefer in and what will you recommend. Image of your own solutions will be great. It is specifically the top plate I am thinking about!
      Thank you in advance ...
       
       

    • By dferrier
      Here is how one guy did it:
       

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    • Greetings all. I just serviced a Girard-Perregaux automatic movement. It seems to run fine, but ends up stopping for reasons unknown. It seems like it may have something to do with the center-wheel contacting the top of the barrel. If there is clearance, it is by very little. It seems to stop most often once the automatic mechanism is replaced. I'm wondering if by tightening the automatic mechanism down to the train-bridge, it's dropping that center-wheel to barrel clearance to nothing, thereby stopping the movement. Does anyone have experience with this ETA 1256 auto movement that can offer any ideas as to what the issues might be? What do you think would cause the barrel to be so close to the underneath of the center-wheel? Any help is appreciated. Many thanks in advance.  Cheers.  
    • I have studied the data sheet at some length and there is nothing obvious to me. On the right of the frame drawing there are a couple of sections showing 2 screws - I assume ?  these are for fixing the movement and the strap might just fit these screws - but I would then expect two straps to be supplied to fit the two screws.
    • Bought an upright tool off eBay and there was one problem, no bottom alignment rod. So, found a piece of stock Brass and carved it up on my Lathe. This is the result. The nails on one of the hinges were out and the hinge was rusted in place. So I used some small pointy watchmakers screws and replaced the nails. I then oiled the hinges and worked them in nicely. Next, the box fabric was unglued on the Tom so I lifted up the fabric and spread a light layer of Elmer’s glue between the wood and the black cloth: and put 4 magic books on top for an hour. Next step was to blacken the box as there were chips of cloth missing and it just looked tattered. So I used Kiwi Color shoe shine and it worked like a charm. Now I needed to shine up the cloth on the inside of the box the same was...and used a paintbrush for the corners bu dipping it in the show shine. Then I needed to clean up the red velvet on the inside so I used a lint role: as well as tearing off a piece for the tight spots. I also needed to clean up some aging mold sobthe line roll with some help with a fine screwdriver worker great. I then shoe polished where the mold was. The last step was to polish the Uprighting Tool using Peek and a lot of elbow grease. Here is the before and afterAnd the Final.     Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    • Naptha is inexpensive, dissolves all manner of hydrocarbons, and dries quickly with little residue. Its quite harmful to use in enclosed spaces, so care must be used.  J
    • Let me look     Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
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