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    • By Matthew
      Good (insert time here) everyone!
           I am relatively new to the world of clockwork repair and maintenence, but have done delicate metalwork, mechanism cleaning, and enjoy fixing things. Just recently, my sister brought home her boyfriends late great grandmothers singing bird in cage automata. For those of you who dont completely know or understand what it is, its basically a spring driven mechanism using bellows and a variable organ pipe to make bird sounds and move a little birdie around and "sing" (Example of singing bird mechanism working).
           His aunt wants it to be operational again, and after opening it up (not yet taking much apart) I have come to the conclusion that it could just use a good cleaning and oiling. But, my question is, what kind of oil should I use and how should I apply it? I don't have any fancy oils except for a bottle of valve oil for my trumpet at my current disposal, but I would like to buy some decent clockwork oil for this project and a sankyo music box repair I have waiting. 
       
           Note: come to find out while writing this, it was made by eschle reuge I'm Germany, probably around the 50's or 40's.







    • By maclerche
      When I look at watchmaker workbenches i see that it is performed in many different shapes and designs. I would like to see and hear about your experience with watchmaking Workbenches. What to prefer in and what will you recommend. Image of your own solutions will be great. It is specifically the top plate I am thinking about!
      Thank you in advance ...
       
       

    • By dferrier
      Here is how one guy did it:
       

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    • What the problem here is for your question is Mark's video is confusing. Normally when you do a balance staff you would statically poise first then sometimes dynamically poise. If your dynamic poising you use eight pendant positions usually. So in his video he comments for this particular watch he is dynamic poising. Then adjusting to positions is an interesting term or as your question is which positions should you worry about timekeeping in? Basically what you're doing by timing the watch on the timing machine in a variety of positions is your verifying the watch does keep time in those positions.  So for pocket watches dial up and crown up are the most common. For wristwatches I'm attaching what Omega recommends for their watches
    • check each as old hippy said but end shakes on a 3rd wheel allow a lot more play than lets say a balance or escape. you can get away with too much end shake and not loose much amplitude, too little will def not work though and will def result in a very low amp and or stop the movement. train wheels being loose is always better than too tight in my opinion
    • its farfo.com dont put the www. or just google farfo vintage watches ridgewood nj. archer is a memeber on teh Watchuseek forums and is very good esp when it comes to high end watches like omega. he is a certified omega repairer, not many of those around. he uses the same equipment they uses at the omega facilities. 100,000s worth of equipment
    • Try winding through the ratchet wheel, put screwdriver in the wheels slot,turn to wind , should wind full.
    • I made light pressure on the second wheel from underneath and the movement is now running fine. Will check again tomorrow.    
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