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    • By MechanicMike
      hi y'all-newbie here and I'm sure everybody knows that buying tools for watch repair and/or mods can be expensive if you don't want some of the plentiful cheaper stuff that's out there. That would be me because I'll be turning my hobby into some sort of income soon, when I retire, and I've already spent a small fortune(for me!) on tooling. I surf all over the 'Net looking for the cheapest price; new or used, estate sales, you name it. My questions are, are there blueprints out there for some of this stuff? has anyone made their own tooling? I'm also a machinist and I'd definitely attempt to make my own, and share with everybody. Can this be done? anyone attempted it? 
    • By Marc5555
      So ive been wanting to build my own watch for a while after having worked on my own watches for quite some time. The only apprehension i have is how does one size a dial to fit a case. Lets say i have a miyota 8215 a 41 mm cade that fits that movement would a 31 mm dial fit that case? 
      I guess my question is how does one tell if a dial will fit a case. I understand all cases are different
    • By Matthew
      Good (insert time here) everyone!
           I am relatively new to the world of clockwork repair and maintenence, but have done delicate metalwork, mechanism cleaning, and enjoy fixing things. Just recently, my sister brought home her boyfriends late great grandmothers singing bird in cage automata. For those of you who dont completely know or understand what it is, its basically a spring driven mechanism using bellows and a variable organ pipe to make bird sounds and move a little birdie around and "sing" (Example of singing bird mechanism working).
           His aunt wants it to be operational again, and after opening it up (not yet taking much apart) I have come to the conclusion that it could just use a good cleaning and oiling. But, my question is, what kind of oil should I use and how should I apply it? I don't have any fancy oils except for a bottle of valve oil for my trumpet at my current disposal, but I would like to buy some decent clockwork oil for this project and a sankyo music box repair I have waiting. 
       
           Note: come to find out while writing this, it was made by eschle reuge I'm Germany, probably around the 50's or 40's.







    • By maclerche
      When I look at watchmaker workbenches i see that it is performed in many different shapes and designs. I would like to see and hear about your experience with watchmaking Workbenches. What to prefer in and what will you recommend. Image of your own solutions will be great. It is specifically the top plate I am thinking about!
      Thank you in advance ...
       
       

    • By dferrier
      Here is how one guy did it:
       

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    • Many autos are actually based on manual calibers that have heavily modified bridges to accommodate the requirements of a bolt on auto module. If you look closely at some of the AS manual winders for instance you will notice that there are a lot of odd holes in the main plates and even in some of the bridges that don't seem to serve any purpose. Some of these are to make the main plate common to both calendar and non-calendar variants, and I would be surprised if some of them weren't for auto module functions. In fact if you look at Ranfft you will see in a number of database entries the whole movement family is listed, usually starting with the base manual movement, and progressing with the addition of complications. I might therefore be possible to start with a manual winder that is part of a whole family of movements which includes autos and swap out all of the different parts to make it an auto, but the cost would be out of all proportion to simply buying the auto movement in the first place, and then it would be unlikely to fit in the case that the original manual winder came from, requiring a new case to be sourced as well. So theoretically possible, but why would you do that? Converting a manual caliber that has no auto DNA included as standard is also feasible. I recall reading about one maker that has managed to add auto winding to the venerable Unitas/ETA 6497, a classic manual winder, although I can't remember who it was. In fact a lot of the early autos were just that, but it's only possible if you have the design and manufacturing capability to devise and make the relevant parts.
    • Is the rotor original? Could it of been fitted with a new rotor at some point that has the wrong jewel count on it?
    • Isn't the impulse jewel common to both movements? Since the "C" has a jewelled barrel arbor hole which isn't jewelled on the "B", in order for the jewel count to be correct for both movements the "B" must have a jewelled bearing that is not jewelled on the "C". It would be interesting to see what aspect of the "C" was improved by removing a jewel, even if it just turns out to be the cost of manufacture.
    • Awww. Mine are definitely much better JDR. . To be honest I don’t know, but that’s certainly an enviable display of screwdrivers. The grips aside, the main improvement I found was the precision ground stainless steel blade. Nice display box! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    • Isopropanol will soften and wash away the shellac. Take care with the balance and pallet fork. Just a quick dip of a few seconds, then straight onto watch paper to take off the excess, then use a puffer to dry the critical areas where the shellac bonds on the jewels. After 4 years using lighter fluid and thinking I was getting parts clean, I now use Elma watch cleaning product. Amazing how I fooled myself about how clean was clean. Also, try an ultrasonic which are very cheap nowadays. In general, IPA (isopropyl alcohol)is not a good cleaner, but is good for the final fine rinse if done quickly. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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