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jarz21

New from Northern Virginia

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Hi all! My name is Kevin and I am finally pursuing my long-time interest in watch servicing and repair. I've collected a handful of wristwatches and pocket watches over the years, but am hoping to get some of the unused ones back in action. I'm usually more accustomed to working on (vintage) motorcycles, so this is a notable change in scale for me!

I really enjoyed Mark's watch repair courses 1-2 and have collected a few books to read through. Have accumulated a number of essentials, but still have some tools (wood-handled cannon pinion puller and pocket watch mainspring winders) to go to work on some of the watches that I have acquired. And I'm pretty proud of the desktop workbench I constructed, so will have to share that in another post.

Looking forward to all of the adventures and learning in this new hobby!

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Welcome to this friendly forum. Make sure your workbench is the correct height for you. Also have a good seat. Working at a bench that does not suit your posture can cause damage to you neck and back.

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On 4/16/2018 at 4:27 AM, oldhippy said:

Welcome to this friendly forum. Make sure your workbench is the correct height for you. Also have a good seat. Working at a bench that does not suit your posture can cause damage to you neck and back.

Well it didn't take me too long to realize that, while my makeshift desktop workbench was about tall enough, the lack of arm support made things a bit more unsteady. I ended up picking up a Husky 46 in. Adjustable Height Work Table when it was on sale from Home Depot. Now I can adjust the height perfectly, and I can still use my DIY setup to easily move my tools around. Win-win!

Kevin

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