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ramos3120

Hello from Southern California

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Hi everyone,

I'm Mark from Southern California I have been collecting vintage Timex at local flea markets, garage sales, online and wherever I can get my hands on them for about a year or so. I have cracked a few open out of curiosity but plan to learn how to do simple repairs and servicing. I have enjoyed and appreciated the info that others have shared on this forum, so that's why I joined. Happy to be here! 

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Thank you everyone for the warm welcome. 

Mike I am Chino Hills about 25 miles east of Los Angeles so my hunting ground has been the Rose Bowl and Long Beach Antique Market. We have friends and family out in the San Diego area and visit Oceanside often.

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Thank you JerseyMo! I I have been enjoying and appreciating all the great information you have shared on all things Timex. So far I have been able to take these watches apart. Putting them back together? Not so much.  I picked up a few watches today at the local flea market so I will be starting on these soon. 

Seems I am having trouble posting pictures.

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Welcome Ramos, unfortunately Timex are not really repairable in the sense that they can be dismantled, cleaned and put back together.

They are however, tough as old boots and if not damaged by water they can usually be brought back to life by removing the hands, dial and giving them a dunking in naptha (Zippo fluid) and then oiling the pivots.

If you do this it would be great to see some pics!

Anilv

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11 hours ago, anilv said:

Welcome Ramos, unfortunately Timex are not really repairable in the sense that they can be dismantled, cleaned and put back together.

 

Not true!

Someday soon I'll have to put together a walk through  to demonstrate how this is done, both the factory recommended way,  and taking a movement to pieces. It is not easy, as they are full plate movements, but so are a lot of other watches of historical interest.

Cheers!

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Thanks for the input everyone. I would love to see a step by step walk through as Dadistic mentioned. I've been searching for a video to learn how to do a simple cleaning and lubrication. I thought it was simple enough. In fact I was able to clean and get one to start running as Anilv described, but I couldn't seem to reassemble the day and date wheels. So much to learn. I can however polish the heck out of a crystal! I guess thats a start. Lol

p.s. Thanks for the timex docs I found them right away and have referenced them

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Start with the #24 solid movements first ( those without a second hand).

I know I have a walk thru somewhere and will have a look around for it.

But here are the base steps taught to me by the old guard Timexicans of Network 54.

break down the watch to just the movement and soak in ammonia for 15 minutes.

tap the container very few minutes to loosen particulars.

Rinse under water - air dry or use blower 

soak in lighter fluid for 15 minutes and tap every few minutes.

air dry or use blower.

dab pivots with oil. dab mainspring with oil oil the balance cups

David S I recall adds a step of rinsing with alcohol after the light fluid.

Of course you should first inspect the movement to look for any obvious damage such as pulled hairspring, bent pallet fork etc.

These are repairable but will take some time to develop the technique.  But, it is a good way to get to throw some tools around, shout out some rude words and such!  Not that I would know anything about that :)

 

 

 

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On ‎4‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 6:10 PM, anilv said:

Welcome Ramos, unfortunately Timex are not really repairable in the sense that they can be dismantled, cleaned and put back together.

They are however, tough as old boots and if not damaged by water they can usually be brought back to life by removing the hands, dial and giving them a dunking in naptha (Zippo fluid) and then oiling the pivots.

If you do this it would be great to see some pics!

Anilv

      the early Timexs had plates that were screwed together rather than riveted.  AND the stem could be removed with a screw.  I find the later ones quite complicated.  vin

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Ok JerseyMo, this was sitting out on a table in the sun at the Long Beach flea market. I can't read the numbers on the dial yet, but I think it's one of the watches you suggested I start with. Paid $5 bucks so may have overpaid. Lol

PSX_20180429_160732.jpg

PSX_20180429_161755.jpg

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