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LucaMorelli

New Member, Requesting Advice!

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Hello all!

       I am just discovering this website and forum after about a year of watching the watch repair channel. 

//Information about myself

  -I have been working on watches for 2 1/2 years

  -I have worked on vintage watch brands and newer watches such as (Elgin, Hamilton, Waltham, Timex, Seiko, Bulova, Movado, Atlantic, Rolex, Omega, and Brighton)

  -I love all things watches, Horology, and its study.

  -I admire past watchmakers and want to pursue a carrier in the watch repair, or Horology field. 

  -I am signed up for an intro to Horology from awci to help pursue (Hopefully) a central 21 certification in the later future, [I am not sure how old I need to be]. 

  -I live in Nj, USA

\

       I love watches, so much that I can not express it. Altho, I find solitude meeting others with similar interests, I am blindsided by the extremely limited amount of people my age that also enjoy them. That is why I seek help here, help with expressing my love, and with finding other people to bond with. I am not sure what people my age are working on or are accustom to that are also interested in the same repair,  another reason for my questions. 

 

     I am assuming that most of the people in this forum are very experienced, far more than me. This, hopefully, can help me learn more from more experienced members. My main question is, where do I go next? I have worked on every watch I can get my hand on and have done tough repairs to some older watches (rusted ratchets, smashed crowns, and replacements of balance assembly parts, etc..) but, I do not have any other goals or any idea what else to do. I am not sure if I can take classes or if there are courses I can take to help me learn at my age. [I am in school and do not have time for massive programs in other countries or states].

 

=After hearing this, please help me figure out a direction for my education and career, and possibly some other members that I can talk with and have fun discussing my passion.=

 

Thank you for hearing me out, and for welcoming me into the community,

      Luca Morelli. 

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Welcome! 

If you are involved with the AWCI, then you are on the right track. They offer seminars that can help you advance, although I don't know if they are ever offered in New Jersey.

There is also the NAWCC,  they are more oriented towards collectors, but do offer some educational material. Best thing about them is that they have local chapters, there is a Chapter 142 in central New Jersey. 

As far as experience,  there is a wide range of skill levels represented on this forum, don't worry about seeming inexperienced, if you have questions, just ask away!

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I agree with dadistic's take on the AWCI and the NAWCC. While I have not been a member of the AWCI, I do respect what they do, and love their publication, "Horological Times". Over the years there have been great instructional series by watchmakers like Archie Perkins, that will really walk you through various repairs, etc. If you can find copies relatively inexpensively, I suggest you do it. Either that or join up and have access to their library.

The NAWCC is probably 80% collector/dealer and 20% watchmaker. Still, there are very knowledgeable people who have a lot to offer the budding watchmaker. One great thing about the NAWCC are its Marts, where members sell all sorts of tools. You are more likely to have too much money than too many tools. ;-)

Your observation on the lack of interest in watches, by younger people, is spot on. This is/was foreseeable, IMO, because of a modern world that values technology and electronics more than the mechanical. There are some, like you, who are fascinated, but your type is fewer and further between. Still, watches will have value to a section of people in the world, numbers which may ebb and flow, so watchmaking services will probably stay in demand into the future. Best of luck. Enjoy.

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On 3/13/2018 at 3:18 AM, LucaMorelli said:

  -I am signed up for an intro to Horology from awci to help pursue (Hopefully) a central 21 certification in the later future, [I am not sure how old I need to be]. 

  -I live in Nj, USA

You need to be young. In the USA there must be at least two more very reputable schools, one is Oklahoma State, another is Lititz Watch Technicum, and then AWCI itself. Also, there was someone here going to watch school in NY, but he (forgot his nickname) hasn't been posting anymore.

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Eco wise mechanical watches are definitely appealing to a wider audience. Young people wanting a "waterproof" wrist watch for festivals, etc. I think cost has put young people off mechanical watches historically. I think there is certainly a future, but perhaps not an amazingly lucrative one for most of us.

My plan is to work through these videos of Mark's on youtube, read the Daniels Watchmaking and finish off De Carle's watch repair book, learn a bit more French, my German is almost passable!

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59 minutes ago, Vacherin said:

. I think there is certainly a future, but perhaps not an amazingly lucrative one for most of us.
My plan is to work through these videos of Mark's on youtube, read the Daniels Watchmaking and finish off De Carle's watch repair book,

Actually since 15 years or so mechanical watches have made a major comeback, independent watchmakers make a lot of money, and the ones employed have excellent salaries. Go visit any watch fair to realize what a big, rich and flourishing industry that is. 

I suggest that you get busy learning how to repair (which is what they do in watchmaking schools), not just watching video or reading books.

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