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Lee

DF & Co pocket watch Identification

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I can't beleive its been 2 years since I last posted here! I still watch all of Marks videos though!

I used to post here regular, but life changes your path sometimes and I'm now getting back into watches again. so heres my story!

My Nan passed away a couple of weeks ago (97) and my Mum and I began the clear up operation at the weekend. In a draw was 2 pocket watches, both seized, one minus its glass. I serviced this one first and it went smoothly & I'm about to order a glass for it.

The other was not so good, the minute wheel is missing teeth, presumable from a heavy handed hour wheel push on! so can anyone help me ID the movement or help me with a minute wheel or cousins reference number to order one? I have two sons, & it would have been nice to have given each one, one of these watches as a keep sake.

IMG_1076.JPG.74ab95a9fade7180d541f235eb93b6c9.JPG The movement has UNO 7 jewels & DF&Co written on it

IMG_1077.JPG.ab8b64ac18111a883b7dc4188e71cd5c.JPG

the watch on the left is the one I've got working & need to order a glass & the DF & Co is on the right.

IMG_1078.JPG.f95e20ff10a9cd7fec4f660dc8dd2dbb.JPG

Best regards

 

Lee

 

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Turned to eBay and after trawling the pocket watches (why do people always show the dial before the movement! Especially on “needs servicing” watches that are obviously spares or repairs!) I found another, which arrived today and boom swapped the minute wheel and away it went.

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