Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Question: the manual calls for Moebius A and Seiko watch oil S-6.  It does not call for any grease.  In most of the posts I see recommendations for Moebius 9010, Moebius D5, etc...  Can someone give me recommended equivalents that I'm likely to find in these local shops for both the Moebius A and the S-6?

 

For your lubrication question you have a minor terminology problem that comes up quite a bit. Moebius Lubricants sometimes go by other names such as SYNT-A-LUBE which gets shortened to Moebius A Which is really 9010. Then as you're looking for S-6 I assume you're looking at a Seiko sheet and that's their general-purpose grease.

 

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I's sure this has been covered somewhere. However, I have a couple of automatic wrist watches Eloga movements that need cleaning and lubricating. I have M 8200 for mainsprings do I need/have to purchase the 8201 for these automatic movements?

 

Any thoughts are welcome!

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I would definitely start with Moebius 9010 (for train wheels and balance endstones) and 9020 (for train wheels) if you are working on Pocket Watches.

Moebius 9415 is a must for Pallet/Escape wheel teeth.

A quality silicon grease.

Moebius D5 is essential (barrel arbor, motion work).

Molycote DX or Moebius 9501 grease for keyless work.

Moebius 9501 or 9504 for high friction (e.g. Cannon pinion, Setting lever spring and anything at high friction).

Moebius 8200 grease for mainspring.

It's a lot but at a minimum get 9010, 9415, D5 and 8200

I hope this helps.

I've ordered 9010, 9415, D5 and 8200 from cousins, but I'm focussing on pocket watches at the moment - will the above combination still be valid ?

Cheers - Dean

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well I would definitely start with Moebius 9010 (for train wheels and balance endstones) and 9020 (for train wheels) if you are working on Pocket Watches.

Moebius 9415 is a must for Pallet/Escape wheel teeth.

A quality silicon grease.

Moebius D5 is essential (barrel arbor, motion work).

Molycote DX or Moebius 9501 grease for keyless work.

Moebius 9501 or 9504 for high friction (e.g. Cannon pinion, Setting lever spring and anything at high friction).

Moebius 8200 grease for mainspring.

 

It's a lot but at a minimum get 9010, 9415, D5 and 8200

 

I hope this helps.

Hi Mark. I am watching your video on servicing a Venus 175. Would you recommend me using HP 1300 instead of 9501? I also have kt22 that I use on the keyless works whenever I service an old (40-50s) Hamilton wristwatch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Anybody have a suggestion for what to use on non-jeweled pocket watch train pivots?

Hi urgur,

Although I don't really have a suggestion I can tell you this, being a pocket watch and given the different sizes of them and usually of a bigger nature (not always), the size sometimes dictates what type of oil to use. Moebius has a table for this and it is somewhere in the forum but also searchable online. I hope this helps.

Cheers,

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As a general rule;

Barrel: D5

Centre wheel: D5

3rd & 4th wheels: 9020

Escape wheel: 9010

Mark, could you have a look at my question a couple of posts ago? I'm looking for a substitute for 9501 when servicing a chronograph. I have HP 1300, Molykote dx and kt22.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, B3stia said:

Mark, could you have a look at my question a couple of posts ago? I'm looking for a substitute for 9501 when servicing a chronograph. I have HP 1300, Molykote dx and kt22.

Thanks!

9501 is a high friction grease and it is best practice to use this for at least the canon pinion and the setting lever/setting lever spring. You can substitute the expensive 9501 with Molycote DX which is very cheap to buy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger, you can also use some mixture of 9010 and something else...(I've seen this somewhere), you let evaporate and voila! Cheaper and probably a good substitute.

Cheers,

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you can dilute 9010 with naphtha.

 

you can also buy v106 and v106 from the french oil lady on ebay - smaller quantities for us hobbyists and it might even be cheaper in the long run than diluting 9010.  plus it's another bottle on the shelf/in the drawer to admire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, bobm12 said:

Roger, you can also use some mixture of 9010 and something else...(I've seen this somewhere), you let evaporate and voila! Cheaper and probably a good substitute.

Cheers,

Bob

That is what i am doing now: Just serviced a Seiko 8305 and was reading on watchbloke .http://thewatchbloke.co.uk/2015/09/12/seiko-8306-8020/#more-3799  he had trouble with the lubrication of the reverse wheel in the Seiko. So there it's better to use the 9010 . I am more thinking of the ETA movements. 

And o my god there are so many parts in the Seiko 8305 :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Dont know the longevity of watch straps as I have many watches and wear them at infrequent intervals but I can tell you about leather as I'm into leather as well as watches and I've made belts, wallets, bags, watch straps, purses etc. There are many different kinds of leather with the most durable and hardest to cut being stingray which also is the most expensive. I dulled a blade cutting 1 watch strap then there is alligator, croco, caiman, buffalo, cow, pig etc. and there are many different ways of tanning the leather. Tanneries can tan the same leather and produce soft or hard leather, leather with a grain etc. Full grain leather is the whole thickness of the leather and is the best. Top grain is the top layer of the leather after it has been split to make it thinner and produces the top grain and suede then there are the various fakes starting with PU leather which utilizes the suede left over from making top grain leather. They basically coat the suede with polyurethane to make it look like leather. If you ever bought a cheap belt and after a month it cracked on the top layer this is what you have. The suede part will hold up but the PU part cracked. then there is leatherette and another form of leather where they take the scraps, grind them up and combine with a glue and I think they call this genuine leather. A leather watch strap that is sewn together would be made from top grain leather on top or alligator or whatever and on the bottom a softer, more comfortable leather such as pigskin. Pigskin can last many years, I have a shoe lined with pigskin that I have for about 20 yrs. I put 5-7km on it daily and its lasted. 
    • Hello everyone, I have a quick question on the video i referenced above. At the end Mark discussion about dynamic poising. He shows seven different positions results but at the end  he just has three which is dial up, Pendant Down and Pendant forward(which im assuming is pendant up). My question is are you only supposed to adjust the watch in other positions to ultimately have these three positions the only ones that matter? Other question is what are the most important positions you should adjust for when it comes to wrist watches and pocket watches? I think I might be spending way to much time worrying about adjusting other positions on watch when i really dont have to be. I also know it all depends on the type of watch but if someone could give me like their general rules when it comes to this that would be great.   Thanks
    • I have this Hamilton 974 pocket watch. It is running strong however the minute hand move stops at 12:05 everytime it is set at 12 o'clock (the watch keeps running after the hand stops). I've replaced the cannon pinion, and the center wheel (center wheel was a tiny bit bent which I thought was the problem). I've watched it running and all of the train wheels are moving but the hands are still stopped. Any ideas?
    • I don't have the tool with me unfortunately but I think all that was there is pictured. I think it is just whatever cutting tool that is described in the images that is missing. The top part of the Mimo tool is separate to the lower part which is labelled 1CR1, and the top part rotates freely on the base. The red balance wheel holders are then placed on the top of the tool. The first image in the patent is a vertical cross section through the two parts of tool, illustrating the bearing surfaces.    
    • Interesting tool. Are there any other parts in the box? Are any hidden under the one marked "Mimo"? It just seems that something, or things, are missing, relative to the patent. I'd be interested to see the side view, and perhaps the other side of the "Mimo" part. Good job on tracking down some info on it. It looks like it might do well, providing it is complete. Cheers.
×
×
  • Create New...