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Lubricants


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Thank you Guido, here is a translation for the rest of us :)

 

"Actually, they don't. [answer to Blake question]. Professional watchmakers have room for experimentation. There are norms that are conducive to precise results. However, in the present table, the properties of automotive lubricants are shown only for reference and their properties. Lubricants have certain properties that makes them appropriate to fit certain conditions such as temperature, work conditions, etc. To know the properties of lubricants -- like viscosity, measured in cst (centistokes) - allow us understand better the art of watch lubrication. Personally, I've experimented with synthetic motor oils in Swiss watches. Those are my own watches that I use for experimentation. When I actually work I recognize that lubricants like Moebius 8000 are indicated in most critical parts in Swiss watches. For example, the escape mechanism, pallet fork, pivots. 

 

Here is a graph of a watch that has been lubricated with synthetic motor oil:  .... "

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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Thanks for the help with the translation but the truth is that I write in Spanish and use google translator subsequently rectified.

Thanks Bob. Something bad happened to my answer I believed was translated.

 

Thank you for your words Super WRT Addict, too.

  

To Rob. Thank you very much for the table already copied and will be in my files and references of lubricants in watchmaking.

 

Guido

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Welcome Guido. From the little knowledge I have about various oils (yes I know a little knowledge is a dangerous thing) and disregarding viscosities - watch oil is designed to stay in place, car oil is designed to flow all over the place and has slip additives, motorcycle oil is basically the same as car oil but without the slip additives as this would cause the (wet) clutch to slip.

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You're right WRT Addict, do not mean that we should abandon the canons established lubrication.

  

But understanding aspects of lubrication in vehicles helps with understanding the ultimate goal of lubricants: reduce contact metal metal, plastic or metal in a mechanism, to prevent wear and make efficient mechanisms.

 

Abraham-Louis Breguet a famous watchmaker once said: "Give me the perfect oil and I will give you the perfect watch." Mechanical watches do not stop being that, machines that need a suitable lubricant.

 

In the document I have given a way to Essay, we refer to the properties of the best known in watchmaking lubricants. Our goal is to have a better perspective of the role the various types of oils available in the watch industry.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Dear Jim, Thank you for the reference. Whether it is saved and ready to share.

 

Here I share a link that might be useful.


Also a valuable letter on moebius lubricants.

Thanks for the contribution.

 

Yours Faithfully,

 

Guido

moebius_general_recom (2).pdf

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If you're looking for more detailed information on Mobius oils they could be found at the link below.

 

Starting on page 18 is a section labeled "Cleaning, Lubrication, Surface Treatment"  This is a rather interesting section of the PDF explaining the importance of cleaning properly. Then reading farther on you'll come to a paragraph starting off with the interesting question of    "Why do watches require special oils?"  Where it explains the difference between lubricating a watch and lubricating some other mechanical devices.

 

http://www.m-p.co.uk/muk/acrobat/hse/moebius-hs-sheets/moebius-specsbook.pdf

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Welcome to the forum John, and thank you for posting the information on oils. It's always good to hear from a new member, and I look forward to hearing about you exploits in horology, be it professional or hobby. :)

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Question: the manual calls for Moebius A and Seiko watch oil S-6.  It does not call for any grease.  In most of the posts I see recommendations for Moebius 9010, Moebius D5, etc...  Can someone give me recommended equivalents that I'm likely to find in these local shops for both the Moebius A and the S-6?

 

For your lubrication question you have a minor terminology problem that comes up quite a bit. Moebius Lubricants sometimes go by other names such as SYNT-A-LUBE which gets shortened to Moebius A Which is really 9010. Then as you're looking for S-6 I assume you're looking at a Seiko sheet and that's their general-purpose grease.

 

John

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  • 1 month later...

Hi all,

I am looking to buy a good set of oils to service my watches, but since I am not a professional watchmaker, for me it is just a hobby for the moment, I have no idea what to buy first and foremost. I found on eBay this auction / buy-it-now offer: 400240980909

 

Is this a good starting point? Until now I have used a generic watch oil I had found in a flea market sale, but the results are not so good, to be honest.

 

Any advice is appreciated.

 

Thanks.

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Hi George,

welcome to the forum. I've purchased many items from Elisabeth and all the oils are genuine top quality. I've also purchase from j Borel hee in the U.S.  and Elisabeth is cheaper even with shipping from France--as long as you can order so that she ships in one shot. 

 

JC

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Hi George,

 

Your link appears to refer to a bundle...and it is not what I would buy right off. I'd rather hand pick what I need since oils expire and if you don't use them you will lose the money. All that said, I would get D5, 9010 and some other essentials for the barrel and pallets...there are options, the bundle doesn't have them. Just an opinion though.

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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