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As frenchie says lighter fluid is great, alcohol (IPA) rinse is fine just don't get it anywhere near the balance or pallet. As for the oils unfortunately you are really stuck with Moebius rip off Swiss, you will just have to bite the bullet & take out a second mortgage.

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Dear Sirs, I really enjoyed it links the information and experience sharing. Now I want to share with you a small test I made about lubricants in watchmaking. I hope to enjoy. The link leads to the site where they can download material consisting essentially of work performed in an Excel document with several references.

Please see this link.

 


 

Any corrections or comments are welcomed.

 

Guido

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Dear Sirs, I really enjoyed it links the information and experience sharing. Now I want to share with you a small test I made about lubricants in watchmaking. I hope to enjoy. The link leads to the site where they can download material consisting essentially of work performed in an Excel document with several references.
Please see this link.
 
 
Any corrections or comments are welcomed.
 
Guido

 

Hi, Guido,

Welcome to the forum. Must say the link & download supplied is the most informative I have read on lubrication excellent paper. Thanks very much.

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Dear Sirs, I really enjoyed it links the information and experience sharing. Now I want to share with you a small test I made about lubricants in watchmaking. I hope to enjoy. The link leads to the site where they can download material consisting essentially of work performed in an Excel document with several references.
Please see this link.
 
 
Any corrections or comments are welcomed.
 
Guido

 

 

Do people actually use these motor oil and other alternatives?

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Not really. In professional watchmakers no place for experiments. There are standards which lead to accurate results.

 

However in the present essay are shown, REFERENCE ONLY, the properties of automotive lubricants.

 

Lubricants have certain properties that make them suitable for conditions such as temperature, work requirements, etc.

 

Knowing the properties of lubricants, particularly its viscosity is measured in cSt. (Centistokes) allows us to better understand the art of lubricating watches.

 

On a personal level I have experimented with synthetic lubricant automotive in Swiss watches. But watches are my property that I use for testing.

 

When it comes to work, I use recognized as Moebius 8000, in the most critical parts of the Swiss watch lubricants. For example the mechanism of escape: Escape wheel, anchor pallets, pivots balance staff.

 

Here a link performance of a clock lubricated with synthetic oil vehicle.


 


 

GuidoV.

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Thank you Guido, here is a translation for the rest of us :)

 

"Actually, they don't. [answer to Blake question]. Professional watchmakers have room for experimentation. There are norms that are conducive to precise results. However, in the present table, the properties of automotive lubricants are shown only for reference and their properties. Lubricants have certain properties that makes them appropriate to fit certain conditions such as temperature, work conditions, etc. To know the properties of lubricants -- like viscosity, measured in cst (centistokes) - allow us understand better the art of watch lubrication. Personally, I've experimented with synthetic motor oils in Swiss watches. Those are my own watches that I use for experimentation. When I actually work I recognize that lubricants like Moebius 8000 are indicated in most critical parts in Swiss watches. For example, the escape mechanism, pallet fork, pivots. 

 

Here is a graph of a watch that has been lubricated with synthetic motor oil:  .... "

 

Cheers,

 

Bob

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Thanks for the help with the translation but the truth is that I write in Spanish and use google translator subsequently rectified.

Thanks Bob. Something bad happened to my answer I believed was translated.

 

Thank you for your words Super WRT Addict, too.

  

To Rob. Thank you very much for the table already copied and will be in my files and references of lubricants in watchmaking.

 

Guido

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Welcome Guido. From the little knowledge I have about various oils (yes I know a little knowledge is a dangerous thing) and disregarding viscosities - watch oil is designed to stay in place, car oil is designed to flow all over the place and has slip additives, motorcycle oil is basically the same as car oil but without the slip additives as this would cause the (wet) clutch to slip.

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You're right WRT Addict, do not mean that we should abandon the canons established lubrication.

  

But understanding aspects of lubrication in vehicles helps with understanding the ultimate goal of lubricants: reduce contact metal metal, plastic or metal in a mechanism, to prevent wear and make efficient mechanisms.

 

Abraham-Louis Breguet a famous watchmaker once said: "Give me the perfect oil and I will give you the perfect watch." Mechanical watches do not stop being that, machines that need a suitable lubricant.

 

In the document I have given a way to Essay, we refer to the properties of the best known in watchmaking lubricants. Our goal is to have a better perspective of the role the various types of oils available in the watch industry.

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Dear Jim, Thank you for the reference. Whether it is saved and ready to share.

 

Here I share a link that might be useful.


Also a valuable letter on moebius lubricants.

Thanks for the contribution.

 

Yours Faithfully,

 

Guido

moebius_general_recom (2).pdf

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If you're looking for more detailed information on Mobius oils they could be found at the link below.

 

Starting on page 18 is a section labeled "Cleaning, Lubrication, Surface Treatment"  This is a rather interesting section of the PDF explaining the importance of cleaning properly. Then reading farther on you'll come to a paragraph starting off with the interesting question of    "Why do watches require special oils?"  Where it explains the difference between lubricating a watch and lubricating some other mechanical devices.

 

http://www.m-p.co.uk/muk/acrobat/hse/moebius-hs-sheets/moebius-specsbook.pdf

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Welcome to the forum John, and thank you for posting the information on oils. It's always good to hear from a new member, and I look forward to hearing about you exploits in horology, be it professional or hobby. :)

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