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I have started the course and am really enjoying it. Course one is based around disassembly and reassembly of a eta 2801-2. They had none in stock and suggested the eta 2750 as a substitute. That is what I am working on. I did full disassembly and reassembled the wheel side then while working on the keyless works I shot the set spring across the room. I am patiently waiting arrival of its replacement now. Frustrating but understandable as a beginner I guess. Worst problem so far is that the keyless work of the 2750 is much different then the 2801 in the course photos so I am having trouble there. Overall I would suggest this course to anyone looking to get started. I'm loving it and it's only $75.

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Nice little setup! I have the same bench! And don't worry, anyone who says they don't spend time on the floor looking for wayward parts is lying!

 

Have fun!

Don

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Thats a nice set-up,  everything you need.  As to parts flying across the room I'm sure it's happened to everyone,  practice makes perfect,  as they say.  Watching Marks videos will give you some tips on control of small parts,  there is a lot to be learned by just watching an expert at work.

 

RogerC

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Agreed. Marks videos are priceless learning tools. I was actually using one of his techniques of using peg wood to hold the spring down but it slipped and that was the end of it. I heard it hit the wall about 4 feet away then landed in a large fake plant. Not even a chance of finding it. Oh well... the new spring should be here an a day or two and I'll be back in business.

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I was working on the Hamilton 923 this morning, (the one I posted pics of in another thread), and upon assembly- The spring that helps engage the clutch wheel in the keyless works, would not stay seated! I used my plastic peg wood to hold it down so that I could replace the key works retaining cover and "Fling!!!" There she goes! It's about the width of a human hair!

 

On the floor I went to look for it....put my hand down and...there it was! right under my thumb! I never saw it, just felt it!

 

These are the Victories that you savor!

 

Don

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What a lucky break Don! I wish I would have been able to locate my spring that easily. I guess the long wait for the replacement will help instill the patients needed for this hobby/work. BTW where are you sorceing your cases? I love the look and want to get some for myself.

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 BTW where are you sorceing your cases? I love the look and want to get some for myself.

 

I get Most of them from Asia (China), but the quality is hit or miss-even when ordering the same case from the same supplier. But, OFREI has some really nice 45mm cases for the ETA 6497/98 movements. I used their 42mm Swiss Made case to house one of my Hamilton movements but I had to machine our the case about 1mm so that it would fit (that was a pain!).

 

Also, do yourself a favor, go buy a large magnet to sweep for parts if (when) you do happen to loose one again. I may not have found every part that flew away, but I'll guarantee you that I've found more with it than I would have without it! Just don't store your magnet anywhere near you repair area...

 

Don

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My first watch I disassembled a couple of months ago was an early 1970s Timex.  I had a part launch from the tweezer which then hit me on the head and bounced down my back inside my shirt.  I found it about a half hour later resting comfortably in my underwear!!!

 

On reassembly, the pallet forked launched and I found it quite easily.  A few minutes later it launched again and was lodged in the sole of my rubber-soled slipper.  In the process of trying desperately to straighten it, it launched a third time only this time I am convinced it is possible for watch parts to completely vaporize as I could not find it. Needless to say, I bought a parts watch to salvage parts from to compete the repair.

 

This has been a learning experience to be sure!  But I have learned to laugh at myself and view these as valuable experiences. On my current watch repair, a 1965 Elgin, I was able to do a tear down and reassembly without losing anything.  Amazing how prior experiences and Rodico can change the world. :thumbsu:   

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Something I always find useful when hunting for fliers on the carpet is a good bright LED torch, shone at a low angle across the top of the pile. The glint of light reflected off a polished surface will often stand out like a little beacon compared to direct illumination, and the whiter light from the LED seems to amplify the effect.

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Something I always find useful when hunting for fliers on the carpet is a good bright LED torch, shone at a low angle across the top of the pile. The glint of light reflected off a polished surface will often stand out like a little beacon compared to direct illumination, and the whiter light from the LED seems to amplify the effect.

 

+1 to that Marc. I use an LED torch and one of those telescopic magnets which are great for sliding under the workbench :D

 

Over the years you will find yourself on your knees less and less, but it is part of the job that nobody is immune to.

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So the replacement spring arrived today and it was nowhere near the part it was supposed to be. I think they had the parts bin labeled wrong or something. Frustrated, I decided to basically disassemble the entire room and re-do my magnet search and IT WORKED! I found that tiny little guy. However after the search I am kind of "over it" for today and will have to resume assymbly of the 2750 at a later time.

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+1 to that Marc. I use an LED torch and one of those telescopic magnets which are great for sliding under the workbench :D

 

Over the years you will find yourself on your knees less and less, but it is part of the job that nobody is immune to.

 

 

I use the knife wall magnet on a handle to search for missing bits, although I find I don't lose as much these days??

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I've had a few issues with fliers and the occasional case of dropsy. I covered the floor with white floor covering and always vacuum clean it before I start working. It makes finding things so much easier.

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The second course is worth the money as this is a strip down and rebuild (with oil service) of a common ETA 2836-2 movement.

I wouldn't bother with the 3rd course as this is how to regulate a movement with a Timegrapher and all the relevant information is on the internet.

Many people were disappointed that the 3rd watch school course didn't examine chronograph movements!!

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I have started the course and am really enjoying it. Course one is based around disassembly and reassembly of a eta 2801-2. They had none in stock and suggested the eta 2750 as a substitute. That is what I am working on. I did full disassembly and reassembled the wheel side then while working on the keyless works I shot the set spring across the room. I am patiently waiting arrival of its replacement now. Frustrating but understandable as a beginner I guess. Worst problem so far is that the keyless work of the 2750 is much different then the 2801 in the course photos so I am having trouble there. Overall I would suggest this course to anyone looking to get started. I'm loving it and it's only $75.

I've been wanting to take this course, I am wondering though, since I already bought most of my equipment, is it required to buy their beginner tool set in order to take the course?  That is if I don't buy that set, since I already have bought most of the equipment in that set, can I still take the course?

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Hi Alex. I was wondering the same thing as I had already purchased most of what I needed. When you purchase the course ($75) you will have full access to level 1. No need to buy their tools. However, if I could give some advice, I would suggest that you get the exact movement used in the course. They didn't have any when I started so I ended up with their suggested substitute. This was fine for the most part accept the keyless works are totally different. If you have previous expeirience this may not be an issue for you but I have had to supplement the course with Marc's vids just to make sense of it. It's a cool course that gives you the basic info to get started and really drive the passion for the hobby/profession depending on your goals. I really do recommend it but again having the right movement will make more sense. I'm sure as I move on to course 2 I will see a different keyless that will answer my questions from the first. Just need to find the time to do it!

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Hi Dwdrummer, I believe we are classmates! I'm taking all three courses. Basically, I'm done with #1 but I keep referring to it and I'm using #2 and #3 at the same time since I got the machine and everything else the first moment. My bench is just like yours! Happy watchmaking!

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