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Parts for my Gramps' Pocket Ben

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So my Nana gave me my Gramps' Pocket Ben he's had as a work watch, but the chain loop on the top is missing. I took it to my local watch repair and they said that you can't replace that loop (I think it's called a bow?) on any watch because "it won't have enough tension".
Is this true? Because I'm pretty sure I've seen replacement ones on eBay and Amazon, but I don't want to order any if I can't actually put it on.

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The bow is replaceable, and I believe I just saw some pocket ben bows for sale actually. You need bow opening and closing pliers to do it right, but it can be done with care with standard needle nose pliers. Generally, squeeze the bow a little tighter than it needs to be when fitted, then use the needle nose to spread it just far enough to fit into the stem holes, then release. It should spring back slightly and hold snugly in the stem. Sounds like your jeweler just didn't want the hassle, or your business. 

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I haven't seen a Pocket Ben in person but...

On the 1800's and early 1900's pocket watches with plain circular or oval shaped bows (Pocket Ben styles 1 - 2a), one uses bow pliers to bend and adjust tension on the bow.

I am assuming the material used in the Pocket Ben is similar to that used in the various cases I have and

They have little nubs on the end that fit into a sort of socket on the stem tube and are held in by tension.

If it is style 3 and up, then I defer to others. I would think a parts watch would be the way to go if there is a way to replace that newer style bow.

Old style bow assortments come up for auction often. I have some larger spares if you need.

Ref: https://clockhistory.com/0/westclox/series/series-17-1.html



Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

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Thank you for your replies, everyone! I went and got a second opinion at a watch repair in another city, since this guy was the only one here, and they said no problem, turns out a friend of his out west has a few bows for my watch, which he is going to ship to my address, and I just have to cover the shipping cost. It's a style 6 pocket Ben from the '60s.

Right now it's got an old jump loop and cheap chain that Gramps rigged on after the bow came off. But I'd rather get the actual bow that fits it, because I'm worried the bent-into-shape jump loop's going to let go.

 

 

20180129_154312~2.jpg

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