Jump to content

Loupe / eyeglass / eyepiece


Recommended Posts

Watch Louis Rossmann's videos on Youtube for sage microscope buying advice.  He talks about microscopes for electronics repair but the concepts and necessary functions are the same for watch repair.  I'll post the Youtube identifiers instead of cluttering the thread by imbedding the videos.    C_eQrbop-J4 and m4LaZsS5V7s.  Use the search function in Youtube to get to the videos.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This scope currently is selling on Ebay for $359.00 with free shipping in the USA. It is a trinocular which allows  hookup to a computer. With that you can snap pictures of the watch as you disassemble it. This will help you  work on watches with complications when you reassemble the movement. It offers a zoom up to 45X and has a 4 inch (100mm) working distance.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/7X-45X-Trinocular-Stereo-Zoom-Microscope-with-Double-Arm-Boom-Stand-/400429169541?hash=item5d3b703b85:g:dMMAAOSwMVdYENVr

david

Edited by david
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

+2.5 cheapo eyeglasses from poundshop, and another pair with 20X loupe stuck on with Rodico for setting up pre-position of Accutron fingers.
I found using loupe as designed it steamed up all the time causing irritation and annoyance, just when you get the damned things aligned--you couldn't see 'em anymore.

All normal dissassembly and reassembly done with just the eyeglasses. Parts examination done at 20x

For Indexing I use a £5 cheapo Chinese microscope 100x I modded for the job. Indexing jewels look like two house-bricks on a circular sawblade

Works for me!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi - I'm a rank amateur so my opinion's probably worthless. That doesn't usually stop me.

I have a variety of different devices that I've tried. I wear glasses which is an additional nuisance - particularly as damaging very very expensive varifocals is a distinct possibility.

However the most useful overall visual aid I've used so far is a 3x magnifying lamp with a circular daylight tube (handy for macro shots too.) Mine is a cheap one (£30) as there are crazy variations in price of similar - or even identical - products. Obviously for close inspection it's not adequate however for most routine jobs it's great. The only drawback of the cheap version is that the articulation of the arm is abominable (cf Anglepoise lamps). Stiff, very limited angles, shockingly poor design including a plastic clamp! you can guess how long that lasted, and a tightening screw on the lower arm that hits the clamp. Now mounted in a drilled plank. Cr@p but still very useful. A competently designed one with a 5X lens would be great, and probably very expensive.

Roy 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a picture of the trinocular microscope I provided a link for in the above post. The binocular eyepieces provide conventional optics and the third port provides a place for a digital camera.The quality is excellent and the unit is surprisingly heavy.

7X-45X Trinocular Stereo Zoom Microscope with Double Arm Boom Stand

david

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...

Fogging can be an issue, some watch repairers drill a hole about half way down he body of the eyeglass, seems to be an effective easy solution with no real noticeable downside. but the glass mounted ones might work out even better for you.

Edited by Ishima
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hi All

I'm just learning the basics on a cheap Elgin PW.  Some of the jewels look cracked but hard to tell with my 4X loupe.  What magnification is recommended for inspecting fewels?  If they are cracked, where do I order replacements?

Many thanks

Charlie

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

Hello,

mostly of the time I use Bergeon 4x (2 1/2 inches focus) loupe while working on movements. I also have a loupe which do not have any markings on it, except number 1 (probably 1 inch focus). The loupe should magnify 10x, but I do not see big difference comparing it to my Bergeon loupe.

It is possible that the second loupe is kind of fake, but I am not sure. What would you recommend for loupe, when it comes to the pallet stones inspection or manipulating hair spring? 12x, 15x?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use an ancient B&L 4X loupe 99% of the time. I have a newer B&L 10X as well and there is a big difference in quality...

I hear around the dark alleys and dive bars I frequent that the current Bergeon 10X loupe is superior to the current B&L and that seems reasonable to me. 

Any more than 10X in a loupe and your nose oil will be contaminating the movement... Go to a microscope of some sort beyond 10X. I will use the ones at work (those go up to 1000X although 50X is usually plenty)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 months later...

All,

I am very nearsighted (between -6 and -7 in both eyes). With astigmatism. Now, in my late 50's I also have significant nearsightedness.

I thought a flip up visor - which I could wear with my glasses would be best. I purchased an OptiVisor with a flip-down loupe. But not happy at all with the visual quality.

I know you get what you pay for in optics. What is the best type of device for someone with old-bad eyes.

I have never used a regular loupe - but thinking that may be the way to go. Any of you guys (or gals) have a reccomendation?

-Paul

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am 59, My peepers are not as bad as yours , I use various strength off the shelf reading glasses , depending on how close I need to get to the work.I use a bausch and lomb 10 x loupe for really small stuff.Recently I purchased a jewelers eye loop (their spelling) item 94364 from harbor freight. It isn't half bad.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Gpsluvr said:

Try this - I have about the same eyesight and this has two lenses and a white led light for each. The light makes all the difference. Quality is excellent, too. Steve

This is on Amazon.

9a821c3e0ee80527eb7a4774a018068c.jpg


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

Steve,

Thanks for the tip on these. I am primarily talking about something that I can use and still have my hands free for working - but this could work for inspection. Certainly cheap enough to try without worry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • These are the places where I oiled with HP 1300...  These are the places where I oiled with HP 1300...  I can see that the cannon pinion is moving as it should once I installed the pallet fork. I created a small video but was not able to upload it. It is a mov file type. I need now to source a GR4014X mainspring, a stop ever #9433 and both calendar disc as the days/dates are peeling out... This is the mido watch which holds the ETA Movement.... I just want to thanks all of you guys for your help, specially @eccentric59 who nailed it! So, I would consider this case as closed unless of course any question from any of you... Best regards Fernando     I could not download the file... I will tray to located. Many thanks. 
    • Thanks a lot everyone!  I'll update you as soon as a final decision has been made by my friend (and depending on her decision, what I may find inside). 
    • Thanks Marc, clearly I have a lot to learn about metallurgy. I’d expect the cutting of tool or spring steel to be a lot harder to cut into a precise shape- I expect I’d have to anneal it first? 
    • Unfortunately if you have used mild steel you will have little hope of hardening and tempering it, it simply doesn't contain enough carbon. You need to use a steel with a higher carbon content like tool steel or spring steel. One good source for this is engineers feeler gauges which can be picked up relatively inexpensively and provide a range of thicknesses of material. this will then harden and temper in pretty much the way you have described.
    • Thanks for this excellent tutorial and very fine illustrations @Jon! Really first class! 👍 I noticed that your image was a bit too small to read with ease, so here's a larger copy of it. I summarized @nickelsilver's method for adjusting beat errors to the following, but you can find all the info in the thread I linked to: “For everyday work, from the smallest ladies’ movements to marine chronometer, I set the balance with the cock on a bench block so the roller table is in a hole, balance on the block. Lift up the cock and move it over- not flipping it, just moving laterally, until I can see the slot in the hairspring collet, get in there and adjust (for tiny watches this is usually with an oiler, larger, a small screwdriver). Go back in the watch and check on the machine. I hold a balance arm of the rim with tweezers while moving the collet.”    
×
×
  • Create New...