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hofnerpres

Escape wheel wear pictures

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Hello guys

I've been renovating quite a few 1960s Seikos recently and a couple have shown very scattered traces on the timegrapher and generally ratty running after cleaning. All three responded to a new escape wheel very well. Being unable to see the wear using normal magnification I decided to try one of the £15 USB microscopes available on fleabay. They are too light, the software is hit and miss but glue it onto a heavy base and they will do the job. The difference between a good and bad wheel became obvious. The square corners get rounded off by the fork pallet jewels and precision is lost.  The first two shots are from a worn 6602B and a 7625A Auto. Note the rough finish but 50 years ain't bad - neither watch back showed any servicing marks and were bone dry. The third shot is also a 6602 but it's a good performer - note square edges. The last is from my new baby - King Seiko 4402. Very different quality. Three lessons.   1. These devices are fine for simple close examination. 2. Don't neglect oiling the escape pallets - it's tricky but worth the effort  3. Once you've handled a part with your fingers it needs cleaning again - it's horrifying how many skin particles appear.

 

 

Fri Nov 17 14-51-09.jpg

Fri Nov 17 14-54-23.jpg

Sun Nov 19 22-19-25.jpg

Sun Nov 19 12-12-59.jpg

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    • Thanks, Jonathan! I always appreciate a good DIY project, and yours was a very clever one that was just what I needed at the time! Kevin
    • I ask myself this. Why would anyone want to put such an outstanding clock of great quality such as this on ebay. Study the photo of the train and you can see all the wheels have been hand pierced. I’m assuming all photos were taken before a complete overhaul took place as the plates are very stained. It’s a little overpriced. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MASSIVE-VACHERON-CONSTANTIN-Fully-Signed-REPEATING-CARRIAGE-CLOCK/163009985175?hash=item25f426fa97:g:c88AAOSwKvJapVdt
    • 200s slow per day is not massively slow. That's only three minutes, and probably within the range of the regulator if the hairsping has relatively few coils (since indexing makes a relatively bigger change to the hairspring length). Bear in mind that often watches run slower once cleaned if they have previously been regulated when not running perfectly. For example, if the hairsping was slightly sticky when regulated previously, it would be regulated slow to compensate for the hairsping vibrating too fast due to stickiness.
    • The watch should run roughly to time without any oil. 40 minutes slow per day is a serious error, and assuming the balance is swinging with reasonable amplitude, I'd expect it to most likely be an issue with the resonance of the balance (hairspring, indexing, balance weight) or slipping in the motion works (cannon pinion). If you are sure that the timegrapher is set to the correct beat rate, then it would seem to point at the balance.
    • Did you try what I suggested by inspecting the pallet fork shake while the balance is held 90 degrees away from rest? I casn explain in more detail if required. I'd also check the basic things like the the impulse jewel (is it loose, broken?) and generally check the safety dart on the pallets doesn't look bent.