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    • By lordpagano
      Hi everyone! I bought an Aeromatic 1912 A1308 watch (have not received it yet) and I was wondering what caliber does it use. By chance I found the attached pictures, I believe it's the same caliber but I found no information on it, only that it may be a Seagull. Can somebody help?
      Thank you!!

    • By Mark
      Join me as I strip down, service and review this Chinese ETA 2892-A2 clone. Seagull ST1812 watch movement. There was a couple of issues to deal with but altogether a fairly impressive movement for the price.
    • By dferrier
      Here is how one guy did it:
       

    • By haratua
      I just got a new Chinese movement (TY2867), and when I push the winder in, the movement won't start. I've manually wind it a few times, pull the winder out and push it back in.
      What could be the issue? Thanks
    • By haratua
      I am struggling to find a way to remove the movement on this large Ingersoll watch from its case. Cannot seem to find any screws that pin the movement to the case. 
       
      Tried to remove the steel spacer, it is un-movable even with pliers.
      Does it mean that that I have to come from the glass? If through the glass, do I pry on the small opening on the bezel (see the second picture attached)?
       
      Appreciate any helps. Thanks.
         
       
       


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    • I am looking for a camera with a macro function to photograph my work.  I had a 18 or 20 megapixel Sony point and shoot that worked great for super close pics, but lost it in a fire.  Dont remember the model but it was a pocket sized camera I could zoom and focus on pallet stones with excellent definition.   It was less than $200 US.   Now I can’t find a camera that will do the job for less than $500  Any suggestions?
    • Can you repair my Timex Rally also? 
    • I have a small confession. I "fixed" it after that picture was taken, by carefully carving the notches back in to the brass with a sharp knife. It looks and winds a whole lot better, but yes, the real fix would be to replace the crown. The wear  to the crown and the plating suggests this is a well used watch, so the results of the service are all the more impressive. Edit: The crown carving was done by removing the crown and stem assembly and grabbing its shaft in my rechargeable drill's chuck, then cutting in to the surface with a sharp modeling knife blade. The original notches were barely visible, so some good light and a steady hand were needed. The result is vastly improved in terms of both looks and function, but a new crown would be the correct solution to the problem. 
    • yikes that crown is worn!
    • Ebay (or AliX for new items only) are definitely your friends, be it for a new watch build, parts or restoration project without the hassle of driving around just to find that IF there was something interesting for a good price it has been taken already.  Watch this video by our host Mark Lovick and consider enrolling the online course for a complete, gradual education and certification.   
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