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    • By lordpagano
      Hi everyone! I bought an Aeromatic 1912 A1308 watch (have not received it yet) and I was wondering what caliber does it use. By chance I found the attached pictures, I believe it's the same caliber but I found no information on it, only that it may be a Seagull. Can somebody help?
      Thank you!!

    • By Mark
      Join me as I strip down, service and review this Chinese ETA 2892-A2 clone. Seagull ST1812 watch movement. There was a couple of issues to deal with but altogether a fairly impressive movement for the price.
    • By dferrier
      Here is how one guy did it:
       

    • By haratua
      I just got a new Chinese movement (TY2867), and when I push the winder in, the movement won't start. I've manually wind it a few times, pull the winder out and push it back in.
      What could be the issue? Thanks
    • By haratua
      I am struggling to find a way to remove the movement on this large Ingersoll watch from its case. Cannot seem to find any screws that pin the movement to the case. 
       
      Tried to remove the steel spacer, it is un-movable even with pliers.
      Does it mean that that I have to come from the glass? If through the glass, do I pry on the small opening on the bezel (see the second picture attached)?
       
      Appreciate any helps. Thanks.
         
       
       


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    • How are you holding the screw for polishing? Typically it would be held in a tripod tool if going for a flat polish. I would recommend a couple of paper steps before polishing, I typically use 20 micron for serious flattening then 12 micron and go straight from there (after cleaning) to diamond paste, Aluminum is not a good substrate for polishing, the surface oxidizes in minutes and that is as hard as ruby. If you don't want to find or make a tin or zinc plate, thick plexiglass works well. Roughen the surface with a clean file before using.
    • polishing or restoring screw heads is an art !       with a lathe (or a drill press)  cut the head and then go to "wet and dry" sand paper to 1,000 grit,   you are done.  the slots are a whole different art.     vin  
    • The original application to build the "UK Time Corporation" factory that became Timex Dundee was posted by Timex in January 1946, according to this article. https://www.eveningtelegraph.co.uk/2016/01/29/dundees-timex-new-group-to-archive-stories-of-controversial-factory/ Production began in the early fifties and Timex produced watches and a variety of other hi-tec products there for 47 years. Little remains of the factory complex now, most of that area of Dundee having been "redeveloped" into the usual collection of out of town shopping centers and small industrial units.
    • Doubt that diamond paste will be effective on a filed surface as it will be 'rough' by polished standards.  ! would start with wet&dry papers going down to 2500 grit then go onto the polishing pastes.  Thoroughly clean after every grit/paste size and do on a flat plate.  Dialux bar polishing medium (grey I think for steel) may be better than diamond paste.
    • Quite cool pice of history..
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