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jdrichard

Watchmakers Lathe Or Mini Lathe

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3 minutes ago, oldhippy said:

Crum’s. I had no idea you were practising on something like that. I do not want to burst your bubble but a basic watch makers lathe with collets would be a good investment, that’s if you intend to make parts for watches.

 

Yes for sure. I am on it :)

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6 hours ago, oldhippy said:

Thanks the link worked for me.

 

The first thing that you are doing which with practice, is you are moving the graver up and down, not just from side to side. The graver needs to be tidied up, it has round shoulders, these need to be squared off and the cutting edge is not straight, blow away the cut metal more often, at the moment it is becoming in the way causing a rough cut.  

 

I have learn't many of these by trial and lots of error's. The issue I struggle with is my lathe is driven via a foot pedal and getting it to a consistent speed is a problem. I wonder if could have a regulated drive fitted. 

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1 hour ago, david said:

And this is a video of the Patek Phillipe  company attempting to convey the idea that this is how their watches are actually made.

https://youtu.be/bhRqIhHZkmk

 

The guy in the video says he has a watchmaker who can make balance staffs today. Not very good only having one who is skilled.

 

 

Edited by oldhippy

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16 minutes ago, clockboy said:

I have learn't many of these by trial and lots of error's. The issue I struggle with is my lathe is driven via a foot pedal and getting it to a consistent speed is a problem. I wonder if could have a regulated drive fitted. 

I  am using a car DC motor at 5V from a PC PSU. Small pulley is on the motor and the ratio is around 1:5

I have also a DC PWM regulator but the speed is just perfect now but i could use with that also from the 12V wire to be able to regulate.

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9 minutes ago, oldhippy said:

The guy in the video says he has a watchmaker who can make balance staffs today. That is only one. The rest are made by machine.

 

 

 

Exactly :D So i can now apply to Patek Philippe :D

Basically, i am making this staff now the second time (and the many broken trials not counted). The previous one was perfect and the wacth was already running without the cock cap jewel. Only had to adjust the remaining pivot length.... and then i let it fall on the ground and the pinion broke. :pulling-hair-out:

The problem was maybe that the pivot grinder tool was mounted in a vice on the edge of the table. I had to take the staff from the tool many times to measure if it fits and let it fall only one time. I will modify my tool to be able to mount on a solid block and use it in the middle of the table.... and will put everything on a soft cloth or mat. 

Edited by szbalogh

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19 hours ago, oldhippy said:

"The guy in the video says he has a watchmaker who can make balance staffs today. Not very good only having one who is skilled."

 

Quote

The modern watch factories no longer make the parts in that way. If a highly skilled watchmaker takes 8 to 10 hours to turn a staff or a winding stem nobody, except the extremely wealthy, could afford to buy the watch. A TORNOS CNC machine can turn out a perfect winding stem in a couple of minutes. They want the public to think that Swiss Watches are made by highly skilled Swiss Watchmakers who are genetically disposed to make watches better than any other race; but that simply isn't the case. 

It always bothered me to see the nasty comments aimed at the craftsman at Grey & Sons Jewelers. The comments usually state that the watch they are restoring should be sent back to the factory.  This is usually followed up by  "only the factory can properly restore the watch" and "any restoration work not done by the factory is done by second rate hacks".  The crew at Grey & Sons, and other independent operations, are among the best in the world. I would be very suprised if  any of the major watch factories had craftsman on this level. . When a watch factory discovers a broken or damaged part on one of their watches, they pull a part from the spare parts drawer and replace it.  When an independent high level craftsman is confronted with the  same issue they can actually make the  part.  The parts can and are made with  a basic watchmaker lathe and its attachments.

 An economic fact is, modern watch factories now do things in a different way and no longer need watchmakers with that level of skill. When a watch is manufactured they can make a large number of spares in a relatively short period of time and store them in a parts drawer to be used in their repair and warranty department. If the repair involves any high level of complexity they replace the entire movement and ship the watch back to the unsuspecting customer.

david

 

 

 

 

Edited by david

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On 9/9/2017 at 3:32 PM, jdrichard said:

 

I have been considering purchasing a watchmakers Lathe and or a mini metal lathe for making stems, staffs and other parts. What is the difference between the two lathes and can I buy a mini lathe vs a used boley for example. I have attached a photo of both.

 

I think the Cowells 90CW will be the one for you!

http://www.cowells.com/90cw.htm

Why?

http://watchmaking.weebly.com/cowells-90cw.html

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 I’m looking for advice about how to repair/replace headstock bearing fo my G Boley 11195 - Germany lathe
Thanks in advance. 
03D5C351-6A33-45A3-816E-712455A3A4BB.thumb.jpeg.030c7c902a99484285803a46e541bbcd.jpeg

I have a book on reconditioning the headstock. Basically grinding in smooth again.


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Can you put these excellent videos on your Youtube channel? 
I would like to be able to download them to watch offline.
Thanks. B)

I have a full video on YouTube on how to make a balance staff.



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10 hours ago, jdrichard said:


I have a book on reconditioning the headstock. Basically grinding in smooth again.

 

 

What's the book?  Its easy say, near impossible to do without a lot of special equipment.  I believe the manufactures used special angled fixtures of their contrivance.  I'm not sure there is a bigger machining challenge than getting a bi conical section mating to another to  a high standard of finish and accuracy. 

but, imo, the starting point is whats the symptom/observation.  If its just some very light scoring that might be taken out with fine stones (Arkansas or red ones, are ruby something)?

Edited by measuretwice

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What's the book?  Its easy say, near impossible to do without a lot of special equipment.  I believe the manufactures used special angled fixtures of their contrivance.  I'm not sure there is a bigger machining challenge than getting a bi conical section mating to another to  a high standard of finish and accuracy. 
but, imo, the starting point is whats the symptom/observation.  If its just some very light scoring that might be taken out with fine stones (Arkansas or red ones, are ruby something)?

I’ll get back


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   The all arround hobby machinist would have a jeweler's lathe,  a compound lathe AND a mill.    i suggest,  a jewler's lathe and learn how to use the "gravers"  for a start.  cheers   vin 

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