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MarkG

Rolex 16610 gasket removal

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I'm replacing the crystal on a Rolex Submariner 16610.  When I removed the crystal, part of the gasket remained in the groove in the case.  I'm at a loss as to how to remove the remaining gasket.  Any suggestions?  Thanks.

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I'm an amateur that had taken online classes from Otto Frei several years back and recently (last year) have been enjoying Mr. Lovick's videos.   I've cleaned and lubricated several 28XX movements as well as a couple 7750's.  I only work on my own watches and have had pretty good success so far.   I have changed crystals on several watches before but never on a Rolex (personal watch).  The inset gasket through me off.

 

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Welcome to the forum. My opinion on your problem and similar ones is that if something is stuck by mechanical force, by the same shall be removed, but if it's hold in place by glue or cement, use a solvent before forcing.

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There are plenty of tutorials on the web on how to change a rolex crystal. 

As Narcissius say there is a retaining ring that needs to be taken of first. Did you remove that. Otherwise you can't remove the gasket. 

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Here's a picture of what I'm talking about. There is indeed a groove as I have stripped down the case.  The gasket on the new crystal also has a part of it below the crystal proper.  The picture shows it face down.  I've looked at the case under 10X and cannot see anything but solid case... unless of course I'm missing something obvious. 

rolex gasket.jpg

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49 minutes ago, jdm said:

So, how come the crystal came out with the retainer still in place? Brute force broke something?

There is pieces of the crystal gasket still inside the case. So probably yes? 

I would dare to do something like that before have investigated how to do it the proper way. 

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Edited : had a better look at the picture, you haven't taken the retaining ring off, this will require something that looks like a vice, but has blades to avoid distortion of the retaining ring, however be careful not to press too far, as you can also damage the lip of the case that the crystal gasket seats against...

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