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Tmuir

Not another oil question

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I'm pretty well set up for oils for wrist watches, but not so for pocket watches.

I'm yet to buy Moebius 9020 which I will be buying on my next order from Cousins.

I've just cleaned and serviced an 8 day car clock which I'm guessing is from the 20s or 30s which is essentially an oversized pocket watch.

Can I get away using 9010 on the pivots or should I wait until I get 9020?

Also I currently have 9415 for the pallets which I know is the recommended oil for watches over 19,800bph.

Should I also be investing in 941/2 for the slower beat watches, or will 9415 be ok too.

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I don't use 9020 anymore. I use HP-1300 for the center and third wheels, 9010 for the fourth wheel and escape wheel. I believe you can use 9415 on all pallets - but would defer to the others here.


Stu

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If you want to stick with Moebius use  clock oil 8031.

I always preferred JD Windles Clock Oil for all clocks apart from clocks that had a platform escapement, then it would be a watch oil but not too thin.  

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Also I currently have 9415 for the pallets which I know is the recommended oil for watches over 19,800bph.

Should I also be investing in 941/2 for the slower beat watches, or will 9415 be ok too.

I have read that 9415 is especially developped for high speed escapement, and can cause loss of amplitude on slower beat watches. For that reason, after a long time using only 9415 on pallet stones I have recently invested in 941/2. 

It is a lot thinner than 9415, but I can't say that I have noticed a difference in performance. I wanted to experiment with both on the same movement and measure the difference but haven't got arount to it yet....

As for the car clock, I have worked on a few and i used 9010 on the balance jewels, and D5/ HP1300 on the rest of the train with no issue, I could not justify yet another type of oil for this application, the clocks I was workin on were not exactly high end!

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I had never heard of JD Windles Clock Oil before, so I looked it up.

The price is certainly good so I have added that to my list for my next order from Cousins as I'm not completely happy with the oil I have been using on clocks and 50ml should last me for ever.

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I have used 941 on low beat movements many times.  I read that it is advised to epilame the pallet stones and escape wheel when using this oil which I have always done.  This probably because it is very thin and likely to migrate more.  That is why epilame is advised.  Epilame is also known as Moebius Fixodrop.  I gather the 9451 is more like a thixotropic loose grease that stiffens up when the pallet stones hit the escape wheel teeth.  It will probably stay in place better at the higher speeds of the escapement parts.

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OOPS!  Brain malfunction !!

Should have said that when the pallet stones/escape wheel teeth hit the loose grease in the working zone it reduces the viscosity making it much thinner. When the working zone ends the loose grease will thicken again to help 'stay-in-place' properties.  Makes more sense this way !!!!

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Pallet stones should not be greased. Not clock pallets or watch pallets, don’t know about quartz movements.  

 

Moebius 9415 is a lubricant specifically designed for pallets and is recommended for both mechanical clock and watch movements.

It is a thixotropic fluid which means that under static conditions it has a relatively high viscosity which, as Canthus has pointed out helps it to stay in place, but which stressed in some way (for instance when suddenly squeezed between a pallet stone and an escape wheel tooth) becomes momentarily much less viscous allowing it to flow more easily (thus lubrication the interface between the pallet stone and the escape wheel tooth).

It is technically a grease and as such it is perfectly acceptable (even recommended) to lubricate both clock and watch pallet stones with a grease so long as it is 9415 or some equivalent. It would however be entirely inappropriate to do so using something like Castrol LM:biggrin:

 

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If you want to stick with Moebius use  clock oil 8031.

I always preferred JD Windles Clock Oil for all clocks apart from clocks that had a platform escapement, then it would be a watch oil but not too thin.  

 

I'm currently working on a Waltham Hunter which someone has flooded with something that looks like some kind of all-purpose household oil. The watch needs a new mainspring so I'm waiting for it to arrive before I clean and lube the watch. I am wondering if I can use the same oils/grease as a 6497 as I have experience with that type. Any advice would be helpful...

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Better explanation from Marc, thanks.  Being ex oil industrial oils 'a grease is a grease' to me no matter what form it takes, so I may have misled some people in my explanation.

Don't know what 6497 is, but 9415 is very thin and may have limited use.

For those interested I have attached Moebius' sales spec book which describes all their oils (at the time of publishing, may be more products now), typical applications and some handy movement/lubes pics.

moebius-specsbook.pdf

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