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JerseyMo

1975 Timex Dynabeat - Basic Restore

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Here we have a 1975 Dynabeat that cones from the Electric series Timex produced.   I'll start with the basic case tear down and preparation of cleaning.

Remove bezel ring, crown\stem, and crystal.   Next pull hands and remove dial.  Notice that these dials have tabs so care must be take not to over bend them.

For this I used a modified 45 degree Xacto blade which I'v added a notch to on the tip.  Place the edge of the blade at angle to tab and back the tab with you finger.

Lift slowly and move to next tab.  Notice that one tab is very close to the balance wheel.  This is where I use the notched tip.  Continue to remove the components under the dial.  Be careful with the date wheel detent spring as it very thin and bends easily.  

Now comes the step that many will find interesting or get a laugh over.  But, I tell you it works more times than not.  The idea behind this is to clean oxidation off the contact wire that bushes against the staff.  It also helps remove dried oil and other debris out of the movement.  I use a very high tech tool next to blow air to help dry the cleaner up.  "Okay so its just a cheap balloon pump". 

Next another tool I made up that is most helpful.  After dotting any pivots both top and bottom, I dab some oil to the train gears just next to the battery compartment.  Refit the stem, press down on a fresh battery and give the balance a flick.  Sometimes it takes a few but this one went off with just one.  clean and buff the outer parts, freshen up the hands, put it all back together.

There are some steps I left out and will add in future posting.

So what was the first thing that failed?  If you said the sweep fell off you would be right.  Why it fell off is because I forgot to tamp down the hole to be sure it fit tight again.

its has since been corrected and the watch is humming nicely.

Thanks for looking.

 

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Edited by JerseyMo
spelling correction

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isopropyl  alcohol  will do the same job,  without "spray mist'.  but,  good job!

very true, back when I did electronic video game board repairs it was very common to use alcohol as a cleaning agent.

on the other hand we discouraged to use of spray cleaners on the old electo-mechnical pinball machines because the residue

of conductive particles could drip between contact blades and relays.  Pulling apart a stack of relays was not fun.

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When the cleaning does not work is a good indication of component failure or other such malfunction.  This would require a more detailed inspection.  Such is beyond the scope of this posting.

However, back in the day, Timex made NOS and\or factory reconditioned movements available to service centers. They did also have the individual parts such as new balance coils, contact wires etc. available to service centers.  I have acquirement many of these and have a nice supply of parts on hand.

I have also networked with other "Timexicans" who enjoy working on the Electrics and often ask for their support and in turn I provide similar favor for repairs to the day\dates which can be as equal a challenge at times.

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On 6/10/2017 at 9:03 PM, JerseyMo said:

Here we have a 1975 Dynabeat that cones from the Electric series Timex produced.   I'll start with the basic case tear down and preparation of cleaning.

Remove bezel ring, crown\stem, and crystal.   Next pull hands and remove dial.  Notice that these dials have tabs so care must be take not to over bend them.

For this I used a modified 45 degree Xacto blade which I'v added a notch to on the tip.  Place the edge of the blade at angle to tab and back the tab with you finger.

Lift slowly and move to next tab.  Notice that one tab is very close to the balance wheel.  This is where I use the notched tip.  Continue to remove the components under the dial.  Be careful with the date wheel detent spring as it very thin and bends easily.  

Now comes the step that many will find interesting or get a laugh over.  But, I tell you it works more times than not.  The idea behind this is to clean oxidation off the contact wire that bushes against the staff.  It also helps remove dried oil and other debris out of the movement.  I use a very high tech tool next to blow air to help dry the cleaner up.  "Okay so its just a cheap balloon pump". 

Next another tool I made up that is most helpful.  After dotting any pivots both top and bottom, I dab some oil to the train gears just next to the battery compartment.  Refit the stem, press down on a fresh battery and give the balance a flick.  Sometimes it takes a few but this one went off with just one.  clean and buff the outer parts, freshen up the hands, put it all back together.

There are some steps I left out and will add in future posting.

So what was the first thing that failed?  If you said the sweep fell off you would be right.  Why it fell off is because I forgot to tamp down the hole to be sure it fit tight again.

its has since been corrected and the watch is humming nicely.

Thanks for looking.

 

DSC05295.JPG

DSC05296.JPG

DSC05297.JPG

DSC05298.JPG

DSC05299.JPG

DSC05300.JPG

DSC05301.JPG

DSC05302.JPG

DSC05303.JPG

DSC05304.JPG

DSC05305.JPG

DSC05306.JPG

DSC05307.JPG

DSC05308.JPG

DSC05309.JPG

DSC05313.JPG

DSC05314.JPG

Very helpful breakdown.  I just got a Dynabeat Time Zone.  It didn't have a battery when I bought it, so no corrosion.  Put in a new 357, but no action.  I know these sometimes need a little whack to get going, but nothing resonable has worked.  Any ogher suggestions before I break it down???  Thx!

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Very helpful breakdown!  I just got a Dynabeat Time Zone.  It didn't have a battery when I bought it, so no corrosion.  Put in a new 357, but no action.  I know these sometimes need a little whack to get going, but nothing resonable has worked.  It looks clean, no obvious issues on inspection. Certainly no rust.  Any other suggestions before I break it down???  Thx!

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1 minute ago, maxbernat said:

Put in a new 357, but no action.  I know these sometimes need a little whack to get going, but nothing resonable has worked.  Any other suggestions before I break it down??? 

If a shot with a demagnetizer or line release box doesn't start a quartz watch the module is toast.

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I would connect a multimeter in ohmmeter mode to the +ve and -ve terminals then give the balance a good swing with a wood stick. If there is any reading at all, then there is hope. 

Spray contact cleaner on the contact wire and keep swinging the balance back and forth for awhile to breakdown any oxidation on the contacts. Then keep your fingers crossed, put in the battery and start it up again. 

This has worked for me so far except for one with a contact wire that seems to have lost its spring temper. It's all limp and gets bent very easily. I have no idea what happened to that.

Goodluck! :thumbsu:

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4 hours ago, HectorLooi said:

I would connect a multimeter in ohmmeter mode to the +ve and -ve terminals then give the balance a good swing with a wood stick. 

I realize now  that is an electric movement, sorry I don't know anything about these, pls ignore my posting above.

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