Jump to content
Folkvisor

Clock Repair Courses On Line

Recommended Posts

I've signed up for a clock repair course. I'm not out that much but I've yet to find anything as good as Mark's course.

Does anyone know of a really good clock repair course on line? Many assume knowledge, block line of sight with hands, have poor lighting, skip important steps and none of them I've seen actually go into anywhere near the detail of Mark's course. His course has detailed explanations; I have yet to find a clock course that explains how anything actually works. Knowledge of watches is helpful but, to put it in a nutshell, clocks are different in many ways.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it "Tascione" which is run by Bob Tascione. If so I used it many years ago & I found it very good for beginners. If I remember I signed up to the max offered. He also has a members forum. If it had a fault for me it did not show advanced technics such as making parts etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a great believer of hands on when it comes to learning. I learned by a master, he taught me how to make parts using a lathe and various tools; you need a good equipped workshop to achieve this sort of standard.   No matter how much you learn by undertaking a course you won’t cover the problems you will face.   Try the  B H I

Edited by oldhippy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I am a great believer of hands on when it comes to learning. I learned by a master, he taught me how to make parts using a lathe and various tools; you need a good equipped workshop to achieve this sort of standard.   No matter how much you learn by undertaking a course you won’t cover the problems you will face.   Try the  B H I

I agree I have learnt,t a lot by experience & mistakes. However a basic course is really useful as well. If you intend to make a living with horology then your way is the best option but many here are just enthusiastic horologists. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I keep forgetting many on here are hobbyists.

 

Sadly, yes. LOL

I apprenticed with a very fine piano technician. I had to pay a lot of money to learn the trade but, when I'd finished, he paid me to do work for him and he helped a lot in my career as a piano technician. When you work hands on with a master it is an incredible experience. He had a lot of patience. When I screwed up I'd always tell him. He would always smile at my worried expression and say, "Don't worry so much; no one is going to die." Strangely, I think he appreciated my admitting mistakes. I know I learned a lot from them.

Yesterday, I succeeded in stripping down a nice old mantle clock that needs cleaning and a new mainspring. At least I think it needed a new mainspring. I just don't have the experience to know whether the mainspring is the problem or the arbour pin is faulty. Those are the 'little things' that really matter and are almost impossible to find in any course or any book on clock repair. I couldn't wind the spring sufficiently to take it off intact so I had to cut it.

It would be great if one of you guys could make some clock repair videos. Just saying...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This guy's videos are worth having a look at, its for advanced clockrepairs/makers. Just looking around his workshop is worth it. The guy has been ill so don't bother to much about his video about rebushing he is all over the place,  just read my comments about the mistakes he's made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I keep forgetting many on here are hobbyists.



That's not surprising as majority find WRT via my watchrepairlessons Facebook page or the watchrepair channel on YouTube. Everyone has to start somewhere.

If I had the time I would love to find a partner to do the same with clocks that I have done with watches but my workload is just simply too high. Clickspring on YouTube produces stunning videos but is not geared for repairs and restorations.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The biggest problem Mark is time. I have considered making vids when I repair a clock or a watch but I do not have the room, equipment or the time and I am retired (supposedly)
I sometimes wonder how you do it i really do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The biggest problem Mark is time. I have considered making vids when I repair a clock & a watch but I do not have the room or equipment or the time and I am retired (supposedly)
I sometimes wonder how you do it i really do.


Yep. It was a struggle before when I had a full workbench. But now I work full time on this project it's easier. However, it's still amazing how many hours can go into making just a few minutes of video.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A watch repairer in Winnipeg told me to put the clock back together and take it apart and repeat the process until I know what I'm doing.

He also told me I'd know if I did it wrong because it wouldn't work.

Helpful advice...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its a pity I missed the boat. I would have loved to have had a project filming how I would go about repairing and restoring clocks. Folkvisor if I can help in any way just ask or if you wan't to keep it private just email me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've signed up for the Tascione course plus another one. I think that my knowledge of watches will help and I'll just work slowly. 

One thing I've noticed is that there are a lot more pivots to line up on a clock than on a watch. I think that patience and practice will help a lot. I finally got the back plate on only to find I left something off that I put in my box of parts. LOL

Thank you for your kind offer; I may take you up on it. Who knows, I may show up with a box full of parts one day. ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Putting a movement back together. Its best to practice on a timepiece then a strike and then move on to a chime where you have three sets of wheels, the going, strike and chime plus you will have various other parts for the strike working and chime working, you will of course have to have certain wheels in a certain place in order for the strike and chime to work properly.

I was taught to fit the wheels with the longest pivots first, then start from the bottom with the barrels then move up through the wheels until you get to the top, you can of course tighten the nuts or screws down a little to prevent wheels slipping out but do not tighten them to much as you could damage the pivots or even break one. When all wheels are in place it’s time to check if the strike side and chime side are in there correct place, do one side first, but be careful not to bend or damage the pivot, you will be able after practice to move a wheel out of its place and move it around to its correct place without letting any wheels popping out, if you are working on the strike side, make sure the chime side has its nut screwed down or screw but not tight (just enough so the wheels don’t pop out) The same for the other side. In time, you will come across strikes and chimes where you can remove the barrels without taking the movement apart. If you can find one of those, it would be easier for you to start on them. The better the clock movement the easier it is to work with. The fiddle ones are those American clock movements and cuckoo clocks.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Well, I put the time train in after cleaning, attached the pendulum and pallet and it ticks happily away. 

I'm not sure if I'll be so lucky with the chime train. 

Dave

With a little practice, you will get there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And lots of patience. LOL

The time train is easy it's all those levers and gizmos in the chime train that worry me. But, as one guy told me, "You'll know when you have it together right - it'll work."

Can't go wrong with advice like that...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chime train works. I had to assemble, disassemble and reassemble it a few times but both the chime and bell work.

Now to dismantle it again and attach the springs.

I believe the wheel will fit in the end of my 4126 Bergeron winder. I was afraid I'd have to use the 'bit' that goes with the winder and then mess around transferring it to the arbour but it looks like that won't be necessary.

Edited by Folkvisor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • "Philip head screws"   are very common and loads of timex dead watches out there for "a buck or two".  I did not know the screws came in metric and S.A.E..  vin
    • Unless you have another watch you can steal them from, it will be hard to say that they are "screw x". You should be able to get those from a normal fastener supplier though. You just need to know the thread pitch, diameter, and length of the screws. You can measure the thread pitch with one of these: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thread_pitch_gauge Note that metric and imperial systems measure screws differently of course, so if you're having trouble getting something that is exactly right, try using the other system. Googling around should get more details on getting the right measurements.
       
    • I have the above watch that has four small cross head screws holding the back of the case on. My question is that these look rather worn so where are places to get these screws and what measurements would be needed? The pic is not the actual watch but is the model. TIA Mike
    • .. on the other hand, there is the ETA 2893-2 automatic GMT for example... https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Authentic-ETA-2893-2-automatic-GMT-watch-movement-Victorinox/132919302254?hash=item1ef29b986e:g:KOMAAOSwuJRcG5Kj:rk:55:pf:0
×