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Hi, I have a Prometheus Biaji that has either a Seagull TY2130 or ST2130 movement that requires a repair, any suggestions as to who can do this in the UK?

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Anyone that could service a ETA 2824-2 or similar movement could do that. But it would probably be cheaper to buy a new movement? 

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In many cases Chinese mov.t can't be repaired becase lack of spare parts. And professional often refuse to work on them for this reason and few more. Unfortunately in yhid case the original Seagull mov.t is quite expensive, so you are not in the best position to have your watch repaired.

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In many cases Chinese mov.t can't be repaired becase lack of spare parts. And professional often refuse to work on them for this reason and few more. Unfortunately in yhid case the original Seagull mov.t is quite expensive, so you are not in the best position to have your watch repaired.

Depends what is expensive? A seagull ST2130 cost $92 on ebay. think you can find it cheaper maybe? Compared to a ETA 2824-2 i think it's fairly cheap? A service would cost a lot more then $92? 

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Depends what is expensive? A seagull ST2130 cost $92 on ebay. think you can find it cheaper maybe? Compared to a ETA 2824-2 i think it's fairly cheap? A service would cost a lot more then $92? 

Yes, it's cheap compared to the overpriced ETA, but expensive compared to an equivalent Seiko or Miyota mechanical, or to most quartz movements.

We don't know if the watch needs repair as the OP said, or just service. Owners of cheap watches can indefinitely postpone the latter, but a repair which costs more than a new watch leaves them with the dilemma.

Edited by jdm

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In the past I have simply checked over and replaced with new movements. By explaining the situation to a customer they usually understand. 

Maybe as time goes by and more brands use these movements (then watch the price increase!)  A proper after-sales network will be set up allowing for replacing parts.

 

 

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Theoretically, the ST2130 and the ETA 2824 have parts that are interchangeable, so it shouldn't be to difficult to have it serviced and to have parts replaced... Problem you may have is finding a watchmaker willing to take a chance on servicing it and sourcing parts for a ETA 2824 and "Hoping they fit". A new movement will definitely be a less expensive option, but some folks like to keep their watches all original and service the existing movements. 

One thing I think a number of people forget, or don't take into account, is that any mechanical timepiece will need service at some point. And it's not going to be inexpensive. Especially if its done by a trained watchmaker. They have to make a living too!:biggrin:

And, I prefer the term "Less Expensive" watch as opposed to "Cheap" ... And, i would not assume because someone chooses to buy a less expensive timepiece that they automatically choose not to pay to have it properly serviced. Yes, at some point there is a dilemma of paying more for a service than the watch may be worth or just swapping out a movement, but the owner may have an emotional attachment to that watch and may want to keep it as original as possible and in good working order. So they may choose to spend more money than it may be "Worth" to repair or service it..

Sorry for rambling...:unsure:

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 And, i would not assume because someone chooses to buy a less expensive timepiece that they automatically choose not to pay to have it properly serviced.

I couldn't agree more. The vast majority of the watches that I rescue, service, ressurect or whatever are "less expensive" watches picked up at boot sales or from eBay. Things like Sekondas and Caravells which were aimed fair and square at the budget end of the market. It always amuses me when I find a greater number of service marks and codes in these watches than I do in the more expensive examples that come my way.

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I couldn't agree more. The vast majority of the watches that I rescue, service, ressurect or whatever are "less expensive" watches picked up at boot sales or from eBay. Things like Sekondas and Caravells which were aimed fair and square at the budget end of the market. It always amuses me when I find a greater number of service marks and codes in these watches than I do in the more expensive examples that come my way.

I think the marks are from the time when mechanical watches were the pretty much the only alternative, and maintaining objects was about 100 times more valued than now. And the other reasons is that they broke more often than the quality ones.

Anyway, the single post count OP appears to have lost interest by now.

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Also factor in that there were way more watchmakers about, they were quick and (mostly) good. but their prices had to be super-competitive so it wouldn't have been an expensive proposition to repair a modestly priced watch. 

 

 

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Chinese watches.

Poor quality steel, screws that break and springs that don't. They also rust. Movement spacers made of cheap plastic which did not hold the watch properly.

The poor steel was also present in watch bracelets where the links were stainless steel but the pins were iron resulted in frozen links and caused bracelets to break.

My experience with them was more than 10 years ago but the experience has made me avoid them when I could.

The last one I looked at had a clone Miyota. Quality seemed acceptable to the extent that I was wondering if it was a licensed copy made in China. Not marked Miyota though.

Anilv

 

 

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Chinese watches.

Always worth to mention for the casual reader that not all Chinese watches and movements are in the same league. For example the leader Seagull makes good movements, both in terms of design and execution, in some cases more expensive than Japanese. However they grade them and keep the best ones for the watches they produce themselves.

And then there are the complete watches and movements that they make for the European brands, legally or not. These are also very good.

Edited by jdm

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