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TomAlfano

Crown removal on a Seiko 6119

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I picked up this little fella at a thrift store. I'm trying to get the movement out of the case so I can clean it all up a little bit and the crown is being stubborn as heck. Do I need to give it more muscle or can these get stuck in there under certain circumstances?

 

Thanks in advance for anyone willing to lend me some advice.935926801af4f9835bba3bcf6465a77c.jpg1d08fe75ac0254f315c165c0c893c16b.jpg6f27c06d26df1ab43df3e3b03d5e0a18.jpg

 

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Press in the part I've highlighted and pull, the stem and button should come out. I can't see any rust around the stem but its possible it could be further in the movement, you could also put a little oil onto the part of the stem that shows then prop the watch on its side so the oil runs down the stem leave it for a while and see if you can then pull it out.   

A.jpg

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Thanks for the replies. I am just now seeing them. I was able to get the crown and stem out. Took a deep breath, said a prayer and gave it a decent yank. In case you can't tell, I'm not super experienced at all with this stuff. Surprisingly there's no rust on the stem, but there seems to be something going on with the date set. Pushing the crown in will change the date, but pushing in harder is not changing the day. And the crown gets kind of stuck in too. This watch might end up being a great way for me to learn a lot more with watch repairs.

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On 03/05/2017 at 10:48 PM, TomAlfano said:

The more I think about it, the more I think I need to learn how to completely take apart the movement, clean it, and then oil it.

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This may be a cheap place to start with a full service but not an easy one, and you may get disheartened.  If you are keen, then a good place to start is a large simple movement with no calendar or auto wind.  Typically a pocket watch movement with a lever escapement would be sensible. With this you will be able to see what you are doing.

I would also advise getting a good book such as Donald deCarle's Practical Watch Repairing.

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I would also advise getting a good book such as Donald deCarle's Practical Watch Repairing.



Dang, I just ordered some stuff from esslinger, decided to get a book. It was between his book and another one. I went with the other one, "Watch Repair for Beginners"

And you know, I have seen it recommended to start on pocket watches before, maybe I should heed that advice. Does seem logical.

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I think that the point is not starting with pocket watches or anything else, but strip and put back together some junk movements first. Like a small lor of Seiko from eBay. That way one develops the manuality and the approach needed to increase the chanches that when working with something of interest which was working before, it will still work later.

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It's funny, I bought this watch thinking it would be a perfect "junk" piece to learn on. But it has actually grown on me quite a bit, to the point where I don't want to do anything that can potentially mess it up.

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