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Deggsie

Help with this jewel please

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Could I kindly ask for advice on how to disassemble, clean, oil and safely reassemble this type of jewel please. The movement is a sekonda

f021263ebbc5673909df0f9a723fbb71.jpg

 

Thank you in advance folks

 

 

 

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The shock spring rotates and it releases here. However be very carful using peg wood to steady otherwise it will fly away. There is a specific tool that can be purchased for this job or you can make one with peg wood. The jewel then can be removed for cleaning using Rodico.

Kef shock spring tool:

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/kif-shockspring-tool

58fee8cedbc5a_ScreenShot2017-04-25at07_08_00.png.a0b3191e51dea13cce0ba507ca274a14.png

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The lubrication you require is Moebius 9010. There are lots of vids on YouTube re-lubrication of watch jewels Mark has many showing the procedure. However found this that deals specifically with the shock jewels.
 

Wonderful. I very much appreciate the help you guys so willingly give. Thank you very much
Kind regards


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Looks like a shok jewel on russian movement . Vostok maybe? 

Oh my word. Spot on it is! You certainly know your movements. I Han spent all this evening thoroughly painstakingly cleaning all the parts with lighter fuel and rinsing in alcohol. Now in going to resEarch correct lubrication before I reassemble again. The last 2 jewels I plan to lubricate are the top and bottom balance wheel jewels.

Does anyone have a schedule or diagram showing the lube points for a Vostok movement please?

Kind regards


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No, those screws hold the entire antishock assembly - only take them out if there is dirt in there

Before reading you reply - I took out the 2 screws and removed the whole assembly. Will reassembly be awkward now?


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On ‎4‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 11:11 PM, Deggsie said:


Oh my word. Spot on it is! You certainly know your movements. I Han spent all this evening thoroughly painstakingly cleaning all the parts with lighter fuel and rinsing in alcohol. Now in going to resEarch correct lubrication before I reassemble again. The last 2 jewels I plan to lubricate are the top and bottom balance wheel jewels.

Does anyone have a schedule or diagram showing the lube points for a Vostok movement please?

Kind regards


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2

Please see the links below. They aren't official diagrams but still useful. The following paragraph is basically a bit advice to any future readers new to watch repairing (so nothing personal).

You can service it like any other mechanical watch. If you want or need a truly great watch servicing course I do recommend watchrepairlessons.com. It contains everything (and a lot more) of what you need to know. I started out without the course and serviced several Vostok 24XX movements using the service notes found in the below links. However, without the proper training that I later got from watchrepairlessons.com, I really can't say I that I did a very good job, among other things, over oiling and doing things in a less than optimal way.

http://forums.watchuseek.com/f54/vostok-caliber-2414-service-notes-very-long-many-pics-226237.html
http://forums.watchuseek.com/f54/vostok-2416b-service-notes-240805.html

Edited by VWatchie

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On 4/24/2017 at 11:09 PM, Deggsie said:

 

Could I kindly ask for advice on how to disassemble, clean, oil and safely reassemble this type of jewel please. The movement is a sekonda

f021263ebbc5673909df0f9a723fbb71.jpg

 

Thank you in advance folks

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

That looks very much like a Vostok 24XX movement. In the "Vostok 2409 Service Walkthrough" thread, you'll find all the information you need to handle that type of anti-shock spring.

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