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bobm12

Tweezers advice?

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I've used brass and carbon steel exclusively.  The brass tweezers are used about 95% of the time but they require a bit of maintenance since brass is soft and prone to deform.  The carbon steel come in handy for the real precision work but they will scratch parts quite easily and are prone to magnetism.

Eventually I'll expand my kit and probably add a set of stainless tweezers.  I'm hoping there will be a few more people piping in regarding the pros and cons of stainless tweezers in this thread.  :)

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Well, now i understand the differences   but but for the watches, no need to stress a tweezers  ....Thanks guys for the reply

You'll find the most experienced watchmaker will need to re-shape (Dress) his tweezers and they apply their craft to this in a most proficient and expert way and is an essential skill that needs to be learnt.

Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk

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I dress mine every week especially the gripping surfaces I grip a file between the ends and gently move the file this gives the tweezers more grip.

Check this video its very informative.

 

Edited by Cad101

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Love my new Dumont Titanium tweezers? So light. And not that sensitive for bending. Can ping a few screws if you press to hard on them. But once you master that i no problem: Great for working quartz and the don't get magnetic. Bought a 5 and  a 2. Dressed the 5 sharp tip a little as it was like a needle :) 

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Carbon steel tweezers can be glass-hard. My stainless Dumonts are softer and still get magnetised slightly anyway. I also have their "Dumostar" versions which are very hard, to be fair. 

As already mentioned, dressing them is very important, including giving the insides a slightly co**BLEEP** finish to provide grip. 

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I texture the inside of my tweezers with emery paper, 500 grit? i forget exactly, on the finer side but c.o.a.r.s.e enough that you can still feel the grit with your fingers. Just place the paper inbetween, close the tweezers and pull, fold it to do both sides at once. 

Edited by Ishima

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Carbon steel tweezers can be glass-hard. My stainless Dumonts are softer and still get magnetised slightly anyway. I also have their "Dumostar" versions which are very hard, to be fair. 
As already mentioned, dressing them is very important, including giving the insides a slightly co**BLEEP** finish to provide grip. 

I suspect your Dumostar may have a higher nickle content to achieve their hardness. As previously mentioned, EN21 steel retains flexibility or to be more precise elasticity but derives strength through its nickle content

Sent from my SM-T585 using Tapatalk

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Love my Dumont carbon No.1s but the **BLEEP** things are sooo magnetised. I have half the **BLEEP** watch hanging off of them. I really must get a demagnetizer....:angry: My stainless Supras are nice though...nice and light. Really must get a set of brass ones though. Have a set of Dumont No, 5 in stainless but have not used them yet so can't comment on them.

Why in the heck can't we say c.o.u.r.s.e.??? or b.l.o.o.d.y....

Ron

Edited by 94marconi
spelling

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@RyMoeller Since electronics are also in my hobby spectrum, I knew these tweezers are anti-static & anti-magnetic Stainless Steel. They don't come with a watch-brand printed on them, perhaps hence the cheap price?

IMHO, they work great !

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/6pcs-ESD-Anti-Static-Stainless-Steel-Pointed-Tweezers-for-Repair-Tool-/272088601890?hash=item3f59be9522

ESD-11 is, together to my brass tweezers, the workhorse.

Edited by Endeavor

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Apologies if this has been covered numerous times, but what are your preferred tweezers, manufacturer, sizes (and material, eg: non-magnetic SS or brass) for removing screws, bridges, etc...? 

I have a lot to select from. Too many. 

eyzNhg3.jpg

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I use Dumont 2 for just about everything.

I have some brass ones (just says '3' on them) for handling steel components I don't want to mark

and a very fine Vetus pair for (usually screwing up) hairsprings. 

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Three 3c seems to be very popular with a lot of people and I prefer number 2 for watch work. So tweezers I use are made by Fontax and they're called Taxal nonmagnetic. There are actually very interesting how they're made casual observance they look like normal tweezers careful observance you'll notice that the tips are made out of a different material. Normally anti-magnetic is soft these are not whatever the alloy is is almost indestructible. Then unfortunately I've seen the modern version and they changed the shape slightly I don't like them. This represents one of the problems of there's no universal standard for numbers of the tweezers various manufacturers have slightly different interpretations.

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Still have not done any real work yet, but have been practicing picking up parts and dressing tweezers, etc.

 

One thing I did discover early on is that your hand size can make a difference to which tweezers work best.

 

I have large palms that just swallow up many tweezer sizes, so the longer ones work better for me, at least for general work. AA and SS, for example. For finer work like hairsprings you just have to manage with what is available.

 

I find that the SS tips can cross a bit easily compared to the more robust AA. Might just need more practice. But I did slim my AA tips down a little finer and that seems a good compromise.

 

Also slimmed the shoulders of the AA, more like the 3, so I can more easily roll the tweezers in my hand.

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My favourites are Dumont dumoxel #2 for most work then #5 for hairsprings.

I bought a set of Vetus tweezers from Cousins to get a range of shapes and sizes, but there is a reason why the Dumont ones are nearly 10x the price and I tend to just use these for odd jobs. Good tweezers feel like an extension of your hands. Cheap ones are an obstacle to learning to use them and you will regret the difference in price the first time you ping a part across the room.

I’ve also picked up some used oddments from eBay: Fontax #4, good for fine work; Fontax F, which have polished tips for handling hands; and Dumont carbon steel #7, useful to use with the #5 for hairsprings. I have also seen a lot of abused tweezers which have gone for high prices on eBay.

 

 

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1 minute ago, StuartBaker104 said:

I bought a set of Vetus tweezers from Cousins to get a range of shapes and sizes, but there is a reason why the Dumont ones are nearly 10x the price and I tend to just use these for odd jobs. Good tweezers feel like an extension of your hands. Cheap ones are an obstacle to learning to use them and you will regret the difference in price the first time you ping a part across the room.

I use Vetus tweezers and have absolutely no problem with them. It's the person and his/her dexterity that does the job, not the tool.

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9 minutes ago, jdm said:

I use Vetus tweezers and have absolutely no problem with them. It's the person and his/her dexterity that does the job, not the tool.

Well yes - this is sadly true, but lacking the experience, I find the Dumonts much easier to work with. :)

I’m assuming you are talking about the Vetus ones that cost about £4 a set? Be interested to know what yours were like straight out of the packet?  Mine needed a lot of work to get the tips to anywhere near the finish of the Dumont ones.

 

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Some Vetus are fake, especially the eBay ones. I have a fine of fine ones. They are ok, but have more twist at the tips than Dumont and are a lot softer. Basically, they are not as good, but they seem like good value.

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