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SSTEEL

Do these hands (Hour & Minute) look misaligned to you guys?

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Looks alright to me.  How does it look if you set the time at 6 a clock. Are they inline then?  Have experienced some slack in the hour wheel on some movements . Making the hand get in different positions if you turn the hands backwards or forwards. But never heard anyone complain about it. 

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At six o'clock its bang on too.  Using the dial printing as a horizontal rule, with the hands set at six o'clock, I have four perfect right angles (45 degrees reference points).

Agree with the slack on some movements, this movement is an Asian 7750 and it does indeed have quite a bit of play.

Some people with these reps have far more unreal expectations of them than any of my genuine watch brand customers.

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1 hour ago, SSTEEL said:

At six o'clock its bang on too.  Using the dial printing as a horizontal rule, with the hands set at six o'clock, I have four perfect right angles (45 degrees reference points).

Agree with the slack on some movements, this movement is an Asian 7750 and it does indeed have quite a bit of play.

Some people with these reps have far more unreal expectations of them than any of my genuine watch brand customers.

Maybe he should go to a optician instead :) 

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I've actually never had a customer complain about the precision of my hand setting, and that's not to suggest mine has always been perfect. In my experience customers are usually extremely ignorant of the hand setting accuracy, they bring watches in that are off a solid 15 minutes and don't notice until I tell them. Pretty typical you'd get someone so picky on a replica though. Tough situation. I second about the dial printing, I also think that many genuine watches of various brands dont print their dials in a way that allows the hands to show truly perfectly at every position. He surely expects too much.

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I have to agree with everyone else.  They look good to me.  Panerai hands can be kind of tough because there aren't a lot of reference markers.  Add the fact that production accuracy (of the dial or movement) may not be a high priority and you have a perfect storm.

 

It may not be a good business practice, but If if were me and the customer is that picky I would send the watch back free of charge and not accept anymore work from them.  You just can't please some people and it sounds like you have bent over backwards trying to do so.

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I will have to let this customer go.  I so prefer to work on genuine brand watches as my day job, but you'd be surprised of some flaws I have found with these too, the latest, a Tutima, the inner chapter ring was misaligned.

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