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Hi All 

Not long ago I was given and old Timex that belonged to my grandfather. It came to me as pictured and I haven't had the time to look at it since, I know very little about Timex watches and I am not even sure what model or what year it was manufactured in. Its missing its stem/crown, so I would like to identifying a suitable replacement. 

I would be very grateful if anyone could shed some light on this watch or even point me in the right direction so that I can find out if the old thing will still tick over and hopefully put it back into daily use.  

Many Thanks in Advance 

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There are some numbers on the dial at the 6 o'clock marker, unfortunately your photo isn't clear enough for me to read them. If you could post the numbers, I can tell you more about the watch. 

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I have looked at this watch several times today and completely missed the numbers below the 6 o'clock marker. Only after looking at it through the eyeglass did I have the 'aghhh' moment. :unsure: Obviously not looking close enough. 

The numbers read 26761 2573 

 

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there also is a timex forum.   i like timex, but  thru the years they seem to change the stem removal method.  there is also a timex dating chart on line.  Roy (of the watch forum) is the expert.

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The first 5 digits relate to the model number, the next 2 the movement and the last 2 the date of manufacture (1973).

The movements were not intended to be serviced and parts are virtually unobtainable, but if you'd asked last week, you could have bougt this for it http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/NOS-TIMEX-Replacement-Watch-Movement-M-25-In-Original-Container-/381990989165?hash=item58f06fed6d:g:HMcAAOSwopRYkkwH

If you want to get it going then I suggest either looking out for a donor with a stem, or fitting a Chinese movement.

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Stuart Baker is correct, the catalog number is 26761, It's a Marlin (water resistant) calendar model. A #25 hand wind movement, and the year is 1973. 

It uses a one piece crown and stem, I'll check and see which one when I get home this evening. It might be available, it's possible that I even have it myself.

Cheers!

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Thanks David, Vinn and Stuart 

I now have the model, date and a service manual for the movement. 

Just need to source the Stem/crown and get it serviced, something I might attempt myself as I need to start somewhere....

Cheers for the quick responses !

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I think I've located the crown & stem that you need. Since yours is a UK model, I don't have an exact reference, but I believe that I have found its American cousin, 26760. As far as I can tell the cases are the same. 

The Timex part number is 025-060054

The crown and stem can be found in the material system 401/1 TX1K, listed as compartment 10.

I've attached some pictures, and if you want it just send me a PM and I'll mail one off to you. 

DSCF1619.JPG

DSCF1620.JPG

DSCF1621.JPG

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The crown and stem are on their way, I posted them Monday afternoon.  Let me know when they show up.

Have Fun!

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The Crown and Stem turned up today, Many Thanks David, very much appreciated.

Like a child I took the part out and matched it up.

It fitted perfectly. However, It would would not stay in place.. after taking the cover plate off and looking through the loupe I spotted why I believe it was missing its crown and stem in the first place, and perhaps something I should have noticed before (rookie)

The Set Lever (pn:443) has been damaged and no longer retains the stem at all. 

So, I am looking for the part, once again.

On a positive note the watch is ticking over and keeping good time :-) #

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Glad you got the part and it worked!

Do you have the screw? I might be able to come up with a lever, I have a few parts movements.

Let me know if you want me to look.

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Yes, I removed the damaged set lever and then replaced the screw until such times as I can source the part. Only option I have so far is a donor movement on the 'Bay', and I am currently waiting for it too run its course.  

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Great, let us know how you get on. A donor movement is good to have, you can practice on it rather than the important one.

Have Fun!

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