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I don't necessarily understand what you mean but I'll give it a go.

Magnetism of items is not necessarily a bad thing, it just depends on how and what you use them for.

If we're talking about watchmaking then you don't want magnetism on screwdrivers and tweezers because that can affect the magnetic components of the watch and it might even make various components magnetic, such as screws.

Jewels and rubis are the same thing. Just different names for it.

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the reason i have asked and thankyou for your response is that when i am trying to get the screws in to the setting , ifind that the slight of magnetism helps with the screw not flipping of , the down side is that the smaller the part then it has atendency to try and stay with the tool , that was why i was trying find out if it is abad thing 

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That would be the upside of magnetism I guess but I'm not sure if watchmakers usually use magnetized screwdrivers on their watches. I certainly don't.

I am curious to find out if others use magnetized blades on their screws...

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Magnetism is not desirable on your driver blades or tweezers with particular reference to mechanical movements. It's not such an issue today with modern watches but if you introduced Magnetism to the hairspring this can cause the coils to stick together during oscillations and the watch will run abnormally fast.
Carbon steel tweezers are prone to magnetism, far more than stainless steel.
Also not all jewels are rubies some can be from other hard stone and can even be transparent.
Also magnetism, if significant enough to other parts of the movement could have an adverse effect on the moving parts with regards to friction, ie.. pushing or pulling.
Professional Watchmakers constantly de-magnetise their tools.

Sent from my SM-T585 using Tapatalk

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Magnetism can be a nuisance and is generally undesirable around watches. The biggest issue is having a magnetised hairspring which  throws the timing of a watch into a tail spin. Generally you need to demagnetize your tools and watch parts when working on a watch. This includes tweezers, screwdrivers watch parts the movement and everything else that comes in contact with the movement. The good news is a demagnetiser can be obtained at a very low cost and they are easy to use. I like this one because, due to its small size, I can also use it to demagnetise parts that I turn in my lathe. 

   Watch Repair Screwdriver Tweezers Electrical Demagnetise Demagnetizer Tools

david

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Magnetism is bad for watches & clocks. Magnetising tweezers to pick up screws is a really,really bad idea you should learn to dress your tweezers & then practice handling small items with them. Hairsprings do not work being magnetised and fitting shock springs that are magnetised are impossible to fit, quartz watches do not perform or just stop if magnetised .

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Magnetism is bad for watches & clocks. Magnetising tweezers to pick up screws is a really,really bad idea you should learn to dress your tweezers & then practice handling small items with them. Hairsprings do not work being magnetised and fitting shock springs that are magnetised are impossible to fit, quartz watches do not perform or just stop if magnetised .

Thinking you mean quartz watches can stop if de-magnetise. They require opposing forces "Poles" to operate

Sent from my SM-T585 using Tapatalk

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You are correct Quartz watches are mostly immune, but strong fields can mess with the stepper motor.  The point I was trying to make is avoid magnetising any part of watch and purposely magnetising a screwdriver is a stupid idea. 

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For screws that are hard to place use your tweezers to hold it or make the screwdriver tip slightly sticky with something that won't come off on the screw. I have used Rodico putty on real short screws to hold them to the driver tip then cleaned that off with more Rodico after.  I also find "Firm" Therapeutic Putty (Silly Putty like stuff) great to have around for the same purpose.        

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30 minutes ago, Sleeper said:

For screws that are hard to place use your tweezers to hold it or make the screwdriver tip slightly sticky with something that won't come off on the screw. I have used Rodico putty on real short screws to hold them to the driver tip then cleaned that off with more Rodico after.  I also find "Firm" Therapeutic Putty (Silly Putty like stuff) great to have around for the same purpose.        

I wonder if you could demagnetize the screws in a small ziploc bag?

Edited by sperki77
spelling error

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