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40 minutes ago, Marc said:

I wouldn't dream of running away, West End have made some very good watches, and they've actually been going for 133 years this year.

Look out for early Secundus models; some of them had unbranded Longines movements in them.

Thanks mark, I have seen some on ebay saying longines movement, I think queen ann collection, I have few secundus will check the looks with Dr ranfft.. I like fhf 70 movement that came in some models.also AS1701 with that detached manual wind. 

Thanks for the tip and your response. 

Best wishes

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My 1961 Omega Constellation. Hard to believe its 60 years old. I don't think the Omega bracelet is correct . I believe these types came out in 62'. Doesn't matter since I like these more squared grain

Today.... My 1940's Heuer Ref 347. Rugged looking watch with its battle scared dial. It has a Valjoux 22 under the hood. It's quite a large case for the time which gives it more of a contemporary

1919 Burlington by Vortic Watch CO. USA

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Watch of today for me is this 7 jewel Oris GP manual wind, which arrived covered in corrosion and looking terrible, after taking an unwise trip in the drink I suspect. 

RIMG0638.thumb.JPG.e339d6928e79e7735b22e5403747e17c.JPG

It looks pretty good, despite the remaining issues.  A whole lot better without the blue marks and the case and caseback full of rust, and it runs surprisingly well considering I had to abandon the idea of tearing it down completely, to service it because a couple of the screws were so badly rusted that they wouldn't budge. 


RIMG0631.thumb.JPG.0166f8cf6daed9eba18166aa44130dfb.JPG

I intend to pull the crystal off, and clean up the dial, but for the moment I'm wearing it, as much to warm it up and drive off the remaining solvent from its "Duncan Slundge" service as anything else. If I can get those screws out, I'll give so more TLC, but for the moment, it is buttoned back up and adorning my wrist.

RIMG0632.thumb.JPG.fd9bcd6ddd10fc950c760c36026eb541.JPG

It is +14 dial up, -10 dial down at the moment, and swinging away at around 259 degrees, so it is alive, but not 100% restored.

Its actually fairly understated compared with a lot of 70s dress watches.

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13 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

West end watch started production like eighty years ago, in calcutta India and mainly targets Asia, where it is a well known and liked brand,last I heard it had sold fifteen million or more pieces. Uses ETA and AS movements. West end watch was the first to adapt incabloc shock protection system. Then again about three hundered pieces found their way to my collection so I learned to like them.  Here is piece to start with , don,t run away please.

IMG-20190402-WA0011.jpg

Nice! I'm a fan of HMT but wasn't aware of these. Back to eBay.

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4 hours ago, AndyHull said:

Watch of today for me is this 7 jewel Oris GP manual wind, which arrived covered in corrosion and looking terrible, after taking an unwise trip in the drink I suspect. 

RIMG0638.thumb.JPG.e339d6928e79e7735b22e5403747e17c.JPG

It looks pretty good, despite the remaining issues.  A whole lot better without the blue marks and the case and caseback full of rust, and it runs surprisingly well considering I had to abandon the idea of tearing it down completely, to service it because a couple of the screws were so badly rusted that they wouldn't budge. 


RIMG0631.thumb.JPG.0166f8cf6daed9eba18166aa44130dfb.JPG

I intend to pull the crystal off, and clean up the dial, but for the moment I'm wearing it, as much to warm it up and drive off the remaining solvent from its "Duncan Slundge" service as anything else. If I can get those screws out, I'll give so more TLC, but for the moment, it is buttoned back up and adorning my wrist.

RIMG0632.thumb.JPG.fd9bcd6ddd10fc950c760c36026eb541.JPG

It is +14 dial up, -10 dial down at the moment, and swinging away at around 259 degrees, so it is alive, but not 100% restored.

Its actually fairly understated compared with a lot of 70s dress watches.

This is one of the rarest of all rare calibers. Works best compared to other calibers.

Take it from me, remove what you can and soak the rest of the movement in kerosene for couple of days, screws would come off like you wouldn,t beleive. Shock springs are easy to remove jewels are easy to clean, all would work like a treat. 

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2 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

This is one of the rarest of all rare calibers. Works best compared to other calibers.

Take it from me, remove what you can and soak the rest of the movement in kerosene for couple of days, screws would come off like you wouldn,t beleive. Shock springs are easy to remove jewels are easy to clean, all would work like a treat. 

I'm not familiar with the Oris 611 KIF movement, but what I will say, is that I was surprised at how robust it appears to be. As I said, I had to clean rust out of the case, and corrosion from the watch body.

When I prized off the case back, I was expecting a complete mess, but it was not as bad as I had initially feared, and it scrubbed up well, with the exception of those two screws. I will give it a longer bath in the lighter fluid once I've left it to run for a bit, just in case I spot any other issues. If the lighter fluid loosens up the screws, then I'll take the movement apart and give it a more in depth clean.

RIMG0629.thumb.JPG.b682e709242eb681fabfa987d9f69687.JPG

I presume the Oris 611 KIF movement is an in house caliber.

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2 hours ago, m1ks said:

Nice! I'm a fan of HMT but wasn't aware of these. Back to eBay.

Look out for 30 jewels variant of AS 1701 with detached manual wind. AS1701 were used in brands like eterma, fortis...

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3 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

I'm not familiar with the Oris 611 KIF movement, but what I will say, is that I was surprised at how robust it appears to be. As I said, I had to clean rust out of the case, and corrosion from the watch body.

When I prized off the case back, I was expecting a complete mess, but it was not as bad as I had initially feared, and it scrubbed up well, with the exception of those two screws. I will give it a longer bath in the lighter fluid once I've left it to run for a bit, just in case I spot any other issues. If the lighter fluid loosens up the screws, then I'll take the movement apart and give it a more in depth clean.

RIMG0629.thumb.JPG.b682e709242eb681fabfa987d9f69687.JPG

I presume the Oris 611 KIF movement is an in house caliber.

All oris movement with kif shock system were in house, oris made all of the parts except the jewels. Later movements of other producers like decent St90, low quality eta2836 .... Were used. Next came big crown with good quality eta movements and more.

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I presume my estimate of early seventies for this watch is likely to be pretty close. I think is a rather neat little addition to the 404 club.

RustedScrews.png.ee2fdd05a653b61b2a81943933c12c8a.png

Here are those to screws before I did the initial cleanup. I didn't take any pics of the case back, but it was pretty crusty too. Actually the whole watch was pretty crusty if truth be told. The 10 micron gold plating hasn't escaped completely unscathed, but by and large, it is pretty complete.

I'll take another look at loosening those two screws tomorrow if I get a chance. It would be good to clean and service it properly, and give the dial a little gentle cleaning.

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2 hours ago, AndyHull said:

I presume my estimate of early seventies for this watch is likely to be pretty close. I think is a rather neat little addition to the 404 club.

RustedScrews.png.ee2fdd05a653b61b2a81943933c12c8a.png

Here are those to screws before I did the initial cleanup. I didn't take any pics of the case back, but it was pretty crusty too. Actually the whole watch was pretty crusty if truth be told. The 10 micron gold plating hasn't escaped completely unscathed, but by and large, it is pretty complete.

I'll take another look at loosening those two screws tomorrow if I get a chance. It would be good to clean and service it properly, and give the dial a little gentle cleaning

First I thought a franken, as I have never seen one, yet apart from the holes that look rebushed every other part is Oris. It,s family are work horse. if not a watch or movement of a calib I normaly have at least a part of a calib, which is how I know that exist but not this one. So its got to be the rarest. Strange .

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 The crown at 3 O,clock reveled a culprit, as impact to the crown damaged the delicate return bar affecting the working of the set mech, To avoid impacts, the crown got hidden at 4 OClock position, this also eliminated the annoying push on wrist by the crown at 3.

West end was quick to adapt the design, here is a sample of crown at 4.

IMG-20190402-WA0010.jpg

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Another dull spring day here in Perthshire, so here is a little golden sunburst in the form of a Timex 1967 Viscount selfwind (4047 3167) to cheer things up.

RIMG0649.JPG

Look out for another couple of Timexes soon. I picked up an Electric Dynabeat for mere £1.20 and another selfwind, both of which will hopefully join this specimen in the 404 club.

 

Edited by AndyHull
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3 hours ago, Nucejoe said:

 The crown at 3 O,clock reveled a culprit, as impact to the crown damaged the delicate return bar affecting the working of the set mech, To avoid impacts, the crown got hidden at 4 OClock position, this also eliminated the annoying push on wrist by the crown at 3.

West end was quick to adapt the design, here is a sample of crown at 4.

IMG-20190402-WA0010.jpg

Another fine watch. I'll need to keep an eye out for "West End Watch Co." Looks like they produced some very respectable watches. Show us more... I promise not to run away. :biggrin:

Edited by AndyHull
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35 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

Another dull spring day here in Perthshire, so here is a little golden sunburst in the form of a Timex 1967 Viscount selfwind (4047 3167) to cheer things up.

RIMG0649.JPG

Look out for another couple of Timexes soon. I picked up an Electric Dynabeat for mere £1.20 and another selfwind, both of which will hopefully join this specimen in the 404 club.

 

U mm , I bet it would look more glorious in letter strap.

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3 minutes ago, Nucejoe said:

U mm , I bet it would look more glorious in letter strap.

I think you are right. This is what it came on, but I doubt if it is original. I suspect a medium or dark tan with perhaps white stitching. I'll see what I've got.

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11 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

Well that did the trick.

TimexViscount1967.thumb.png.1cf02bc5faa70aae83c60524bf5171ef.pngI popped it on a dark tan strap with matching stitching and butterfly clasp, and... it stopped raining. :D

Yes, yes that looks good. Four thousand percent more classic.

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Well, I'm glad I can say that I started the most popular thread on here, it was originally called "Watch of the day" a parody of "match of the day" which was a UK football (soccer show) but someone in their infinite wisdom changed the thread name to "Watch of today" instead. Glad this thread is thriving and will post some more of my beauties soon. ;-)

 

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West end watch manual wind were and still are populare in Asia. Various calibers but mostty FHF came in them. Copper rings pressed as the back was screwed on, insured reliable waterproof- ness for daily use.Here is one powered by fhf67.

 

IMG-20190402-WA0008.jpg

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16 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

I had a quick look on ebay, "West End Watch" are some nice examples. I presume that, like HMT, they were popular with the Indian armed forces.

Yes,  Note the collecrion's name, SOWAR, which as I heard means warrior in one of Indian dialogues and the dial is millitary.

I just though to poat samples showing flags of countries such as Irag.which was made for Iragi millitary.

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The name might also be a play on words, sowar translated phonetically to Hindi (according to Google translate) comes out as घुड़सवार (ghudasavaar)
    
Which could mean equestrian, horseman, cavalier, cavalryman, rider.   Sowar may also be a play on the verb to soar, or fly, so it might appeal to infantry and pilots alike.

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10 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

The name might also be a play on words, sowar translated phonetically to Hindi (according to Google translate) comes out as घुड़सवार (ghudasavaar)
    
Which could mean equestrian, horseman, cavalier, cavalryman, rider.   Sowar may also be a play on the verb to soar, or fly, so it might appeal to infantry and pilots alike.

Come to think of it   in fasri we say Savar with same meanings you said, rider, mainly a horseman in war,  also a wife may be said to savar he husband, ride him as if an arse, or a horse. She is the ruler, commander.:lol: sounds familiar. Universal:pulling-hair-out:

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18 minutes ago, Nucejoe said:

Come to think of it   in fasri we say Savar with same meanings you said, rider, mainly a horseman in war,  also a wife may be said to savar he husband, ride him as if an arse, or a horse. She is the ruler, commander.:lol: sounds familiar. Universal:pulling-hair-out:

The "V" and "W" sounds are often transposed or similar, particularly in related (Indo-germanic) languages. Volks Wagen for example, to my Scottish ear, when spoken by a German speaker, I can't hear the difference between the V and the W.

The Scottish dialect is fairly guttural, more Germain/Scandinavian than Latinate/French and has a back of the throat CH sound like Dutch, German, Arabic and so forth. In received pronunciation BBC English, such a sound doesn't exist, so Scottish words like loch and quaich are sounded by RP speakers with a CK sound instead, which grates on my ear a bit I must admit.  

Regarding the V and W similarity,  I had an electronics lecturer many years back. He was an Indian, and I spent a good few minutes at the start of the lecturer trying to figure out what he was talking about, as he was pronouncing Valve (as in thermionic tube radio valve) with a W sound and an o for the a, so his lecture contained many instances of the word wolvf and  wolvfs. 

My wife and my niece, who are Hindi speaker, fall about laughing at my futile attempts to correctly pronounce ghee (clarified butter). There is a subtle soft H to the start of the word that my untrained ancient ears and my set in its ways tounge simply don't quite tune in to and replicate correctly.

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1 hour ago, AndyHull said:

The "V" and "W" sounds are often transposed or similar, particularly in related (Indo-germanic) languages. Volks Wagen for example, to my Scottish ear, when spoken by a German speaker, I can't hear the difference between the V and the W.

The Scottish dialect is fairly guttural, more Germain/Scandinavian than Latinate/French and has a back of the throat CH sound like Dutch, German, Arabic and so forth. In received pronunciation BBC English, such a sound doesn't exist, so Scottish words like loch and quaich are sounded by RP speakers with a CK sound instead, which grates on my ear a bit I must admit.  

Regarding the V and W similarity,  I had an electronics lecturer many years back. He was an Indian, and I spent a good few minutes at the start of the lecturer trying to figure out what he was talking about, as he was pronouncing Valve (as in thermionic tube radio valve) with a W sound and an o for the a, so his lecture contained many instances of the word wolvf and  wolvfs. 

My wife and my niece, who are Hindi speaker, fall about laughing at my futile attempts to correctly pronounce ghee (clarified butter). There is a subtle soft H to the start of the word that my untrained ancient ears and my set in its ways tounge simply don't quite tune in to and replicate correctly.

Same V and W story here and in other parts of the world.

The guys name was wendel, when asked what his name was, he would say,  Vendel with a vouble U.:lol:

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