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My 1961 Omega Constellation. Hard to believe its 60 years old. I don't think the Omega bracelet is correct . I believe these types came out in 62'. Doesn't matter since I like these more squared grain

Today.... My 1940's Heuer Ref 347. Rugged looking watch with its battle scared dial. It has a Valjoux 22 under the hood. It's quite a large case for the time which gives it more of a contemporary

Since I've already featured the wristwatch I'm wearing today, I'll highlight today's pocket watch. It's a 1913 South Bend 16s. It has gold inlaid engravings on the movement and the jewels are in gold

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I found this Summit on ebay going for not much £ - just loved the look of it. The hands are beautifully blued. 

A clean+oil, new mainspring and strap, it's running well and looks great 

The movement is a 17J A Schild 1130, which would date it to 1955-60, but it looks more modern to me.

Anyone heard of Summit ?

 

 

20160709_172719.jpg

20160709_184810.jpg

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NIce watch.

I have heard of Summit, had one go through my hands a few years ago. If I remember correctly it was a 1970's gold plated auto with an AS movement. Sadly no pics though as I was without a camera at the time.

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Quick fix on Philippines watch, got this from watchguy, finally got around to looking at it, broken winding rotor, looks like it just fell apart, think I paid more for shipping:startle: anyway checked overall movement 7s36a /cleaned brace, reblackened '60' at top with permanent marker, polished up crystal a bit and running good, like those blue dialed Seikos!DSCF0233.JPG

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18 hours ago, mikepilk said:

The movement is a 17J A Schild 1130, which would date it to 1955-60, but it looks more modern to me.

Anyone heard of Summit ?

I'm also working on a Summit watch right now (ETA 1120) which stylistically looks a little older than yours. The dial certainly isn't in such great condition! But I also wondered about the make and found this discussion via Google:

http://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/archive/index.php/t-1239861.html

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04-11-2013, 19:41
Does anyone have any information on the history of Summit Watches,I understand these were made at Summit House on Nursery St and were supplied to the forces in ww2.Better still anyone got one to sell? Did anyone work there?

My first job on leaving school was as an apprentice watchmaker at Summit House on Nursery Street. Norman Churchill was the main watchmaker who taught me a lot about the trade. I can tell you that no watches were made at Summit house, however, they were assembled there because that was one of my jobs. Mr Booles was the chief buyer and was often dispatched to Switzerland to buy watch movements. These arrived in boxes of 100 or so and I had the job of fitting each one into a watch case. Sometimes solid gold, but more often cheaper metal. 

The cheaper movements were given a new name (Leda) and the more expensive ones, Summit. That was another of my jobs, removing whatever name was printed on the dial and then printing either Summit or Leda. the degree of precision was astounding really to say it was all hand done. 

I love getting some historical background to watches I'm trying to repair. Please share anything else you find!

Nick

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I've been wearing this today as I've just changed the battery, ( now on it's 3rd ), the movement is small but the dial is a real penny and the spitfire on the box is wrong for the era ! I suppose that's what happens when stuff's made in China :)

 

WP_20160710_13_45_25_Pro.jpg

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3 hours ago, jdm said:

I don't know what's going here on with all these Seiko! It's time to end it!

28212659216_a655bc86b9_c.jpg

SARY056, a real JDM. I totally love it, pimpadelic!

 

 

 

Now that's just not fair posting things like that to upset me :D That is absolutely stunning, really like that :thumbsu:

That summit is a real gem also, unbelievably clean and sharp.

 

Mean while im faced with 3 x brand new Seiko's on my bench which have been drowned in.........WD40 :pulling-hair-out:

DSC05228.JPG

 

Why lord do people do this :(

 

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4 hours ago, MrBeat said:

 

 

Now that's just not fair posting things like that to upset me :D That is absolutely stunning, really like that :thumbsu:

That summit is a real gem also, unbelievably clean and sharp.

 

Mean while im faced with 3 x brand new Seiko's on my bench which have been drowned in.........WD40 :pulling-hair-out:

DSC05228.JPG

 

Why lord do people do this :(

 

Wow that is about as bad an oil bath as I've ever seen. People that do this are able to open a watch case, but past that have absolutely no idea of what they are doing.

JC

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Sadly all three had loose case backs so i assume they were undone and then filled from back. One watch is complete and clean but with very minor dial stains ( despite cleaning ), the second requires a new balance and the third is being done today. Hopefully the third one is fine after cleaning but the amount of wd40 is getting all over everything so i have to wash all tools and trays after disassembly.

But on a upward note i should have my German chronometer finished today so i will post pictures when that's done :thumbsu:

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2 hours ago, MrBeat said:

... the amount of wd40 is getting all over everything so i have to wash all tools and trays after disassembly.

 

I'd almost think it would have been worth rinsing the whole movement (except perhaps the date rings) in naptha and letting it dry before disassembly.

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19 minutes ago, svorkoetter said:

I'd almost think it would have been worth rinsing the whole movement (except perhaps the date rings) in naptha and letting it dry before disassembly.

Actually funny you mention that coz thats what i just did...sadly noticed the balance was mangled but luckily i got more parts coming soon :)

 

On a brighter note two new watches freshly finished today. The Junghans has taken about two months to perfect but its worth it because there's no point saying chronometer on the dial if the movements not up to scratch. The Tissot was thrown away in rubbish but i wasn't put off by the damaged casing and broken movement it was worth the time and effort.

 

Junghans J82/1 Chronometer - Serviced & repaired, balance rebuilt, hands polished and re lumed, dial refinished to original spec with new lume and hand polished indices, Italian made Ostrich strap ( super soft ).

DSC05233.JPGDSC05128.JPG

 

Tissot 28.5R-21 Automatic - Serviced & Repaired ,Dial Cleaned ,Hands cleaned, Rotor restored ( Dial markers were gone/moved before i cleaned her :( )

DSC05234.JPGDSC05212.JPG

The pair ready to wear :)

DSC05231.JPG

 

I have an unusual Orient watch now commanding my attention so im back off into the fray :D

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So after 6 weeks finally finished a little side project Orient which will be one of my daily wears me thinks. Can not find any original photos of what this watch looked like originally but it had an outer casing secured with massive screws ( now replaced with Swiss short screws ). Movement suffered moisture damage but each part was treated and cleaned, replaced seconds pinion.

Promise this will be last post for a while :)

 

Orient Diver - 46943 Automatic - Screwdown Crown - Casing hand polished - Case back satin finished on lathe - Glass surround damage removed on lathe , left as satin finish - New domed Japanese glass - NATO Strap

DSC05243.JPGDSC05244.JPGDSC05239.JPG

 

If anyone can find a photo of what this model was supposed to look like id be interested :thumbsu:

Anyway that's it from me for a while, time for cuppa tea :)

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I think it should have a resin case/strap like this one hence the long case screws where you would find one has me beat tho.IMG_0329.jpg

Edited by Cad101
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