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    • One thing these old Soviet chronograph hands are good in, is stripping off their riveted pipe-bushing after having been 30 years (or more) stuck on a pivot. Not all of them do, but regardless how careful you are, it certainly happens more often than you wish for. So, this original chrono seconds recorder hand is not an exception. The problem is however, that the original hands are very hard to find apart from a set with a whole other ($$$) chronograph attached to them. There are modern substitutes for these hands, but they are a poor copy / wrong shape of the real. Often you can press the hand back on the stripped bushing and with a 45 degrees point  carefully rivet them back on, however I wasn't that lucky with this one. Using a pin-vice I deformed the old soft pipe-bushing and subsequent repair attempt made things only worse, to the point of a non-salvageable pipe-bushing . Now at least two years later, I decided to give it another attempt to repair the original hand. To get to a "new" pipe-bushing I scarified one of the modern hands.  The "new"-bushing had to be carefully knocked out, hoping to recover as much of the riveted edge as possible. In order to fit the original hand onto the "new" 0.45mm pipe bushing with its "used" riveted edge, I had to enlarge the hole in the original hand to 0.5mm. The original hand "clicked" over the riveted edge, but sadly there is not enough material protruding to create a new rivet edge. It didn't take a lot of "force" for the bushing to drop out again. The nature of this game is such that with these fragile materials and fine edges, one doesn't have many "attempts" to get it right. Now knowing that "riveting" does not provide enough strength (there is simple not enough material protruding to do so), another solution has to be found. The current status is that I managed to get the pipe-bushing back on, it sits straight and square to the hand. Bottom view; Top view; as you can see the material just makes it to the top of the hand. Most likely the pipe bushing is a copper alloy and the hand is made of "steel". Now the question is; who has a brilliant idea, which works (preferable somebody who has been in the same situation before), to connect these two metals? I would love to hear your suggestions   
    • Hi Joel,  How did you diagnose water intrusion, did you actually see moisture inside?  Dose it run at all? Could hands be rubbing?   I move hands away from each other.            
    • If it was me I would first just massage the spring at the 07:00 o'clock position. You might be lucky in thats all thats need moving.  What I call the terminal curve (Blue) is critical that it has a uniform curve in relation to the curve of the  main body of the spring. If not when regulating the spring it will go out of centre. 
    • Welcome to the forum and enjoy.
    • ... and here it is half a day later. Things are settling down quite nicely. Bear in mind that other than cleaning the random bunch of BFG866 parts, and throwing them all together, I've done nothing else yet. No regulation or adjusting.
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