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    • I am new to watch repair and am cautiously attempting my first project. My wife has a Ripcurl Classic Surf Watch which stopped. I took it to a jeweller to get a new battery but they said it wouldn't go and the movement was non functional. I proceeded to do some forum and youtube research and bought a case opened and holder. I removed the back and found that it had a Ronda 763 movement marked Swiss Parts Thailand Made, 1 Jewel, Ronda and 763. Some web research indicated that this is a cheap movement but a better quality Swiss made 763 movement was available. I found one of these online and purchased it. In the mean time I also purchased a hand remover and installer. I have successfully removed the crown and movement and removed the hands but I cannot work out how to remove the dial from the movement. Online sites show the Swiss 763 movement and indicate the holes where the dial feet are which the new movement does have but the old one does not. I have looked right around the edge but there is no obvious mechanism. How do I remove the dial from the original movement and how do I use the dial feet attachment on the new movement?  
    • Hi there! Not yet tbh I don't see that dial style that often for sale on eBay... Least not under £100 lol
    • Hi Watcheasol,  It's just a number 23124326 or something - its a serial number. Cheers
    • Just guessing here, but maybe it's from some kind of sealed timing device, for competitions, like pigeon racing or something.
    • The way you're supposed to think of cleaning is that all of it is cleaning. the first bath has chemicals to dissolve the oils Remove oxides make the plates bright put things into the solution make things clean overly simplistic probably but it cleans. The rinse also continues to dissolve things into the solution and is technically cleaning. The other thing it is doing is reducing the concentration of the original solution. Which is why typically a cleaning solution followed by two separate rinses unless looking at the modern machines that might have three rinses. If you notice up above nickelsilver Posted that he's using isopropyl alcohol is his rinse actually has two of them. Then looks like were similar for clocks in that I use a commercial solution and follow up with hot running water then immediately in the alcohol. But I still don't have enough experience I've only cleaned a couple of clocks. Then it looks like the demineralized and distilled water is basically just really really clean water. Depending upon where you live the quality of water and its impurities plus the fluorides chlorine might be a problem. Then as far as ultrasonic goes it really doesn't have to be fancy. I started off with a small machine purchased from the drugstore don't think it cost very much money has really surprise was like why Outlook it's 20 and $30 like a century ago or something. Specifically designed where you're supposed to put a beaker into the ultrasonic which today everybody frowns on you shouldn't have anything directly on top of the transducer there should be a separation as bad things will supposedly happen. Except that machine ran for I don't even remember how many years a lot of years before it finally disintegrated. So it didn't seem to suffer any problems of having a beaker directly on top and then surrounded by water to couple the energy. Now if you scroll down the page at the link below I'm using a bigger ultrasonic and to keep everybody happy  and not fuss the beaker is on something above the transducers surrounded by water. https://www.watchrepairtalk.com/topic/285-ultrasonic-cleaners/page/4/?tab=comments#comment-33803  
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