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    • By HongJiho
      Hi my friends.
      I saw WRT video in youtube. It's so helpful to me. Thank you Watch Repair Channel.
      After watching video, I'm looking for watch repair oil and grease.
      I want know what oil & grease need to beginner.
      In addition, I want know what oil &grease used in video (7s26 repiar video).
      If anyone knew about that, help my work.
      I will very appreciate any information or links.
      Thank you to read my poor writing. 
    • By Bethan36
      Hi Fellow People,
      Im reaching out as I’m currently learning all I can about watchmaking, and am working through the BHI distance learning technicians course, with my exam booked for May. 
      I will need to service a quartz watch as part of my practical exam, and am learning about watch lubrication. 
      A few months ago I found a great article that covered the technique for dipping and collecting the right amount of oil on the oiler, such as the speed and angle of the dip, however, I now can’t find it anywhere, no matter how much I search the internet 
      Does anyone have or can point me in the right direction of instructions specifically on oil collection on the oiler?  As you will know there is lots on the actual oiling process but not the oil collection process.
      Any help would be greatly appreciated.  
      Thanks
      Bethan
       
    • By east3rn
      Hello. I am considering buying a bottle of fixodrop and I found that there are many options regarding the quantity.
      Since I am hobbyist watchmaker, I don't service a watch very often.(Couple of them in a month)
      In this case, would it be okay to purchase the smallest amount of fixodrop(1ml)? 
      One more thing. Is there anything else I should get to apply the fixodrop to my pallet fork? 
    • By WorldPowerLabs
      Hello all,
      I'm about to service a Timex 260 electric movement.  It's running strong as-is, but I doubt that it has been cleaned or lubricated in its lifetime.  I do have the service manual for the movement and for most of the oil points, the SM calls for Moebius Synt-A-Lube, without specifying a product number (I intend to use Moebius 9010), but for the friction pinion the manual calls for "spreading type oil" (Woods AAAA oil).  I cannot find a cross-reference for this old Woods oil and most watch oils are, of course, specifically formulated to NOT spread...  so, I'm seeking advice and suggestions for a suitable oil to use on the friction pinion.  Also, if anyone thinks that 9010 is NOT appropriate to use for the various other points, please let me know.
      Thanks much!
      Ben
    • By Paul78
      Hi all, I'm thinking about investing in the set of automatic oilers available from cousins. They cost about 200 quid with the VAT, that's obviously a lot of money so just wondered if any of you use them and are they worth the money? 
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    • Make sure you have plenty of leg room. You could be sat there for hours so you do not want to be cramped up. 
    • good show,  you did good by not removing the balance till the main spring was let down.  "no pallets in this design!"   a watch "with pallets"  it is proper to remove the ballance before spring let down.   keep up the good work.   vin
    • Hi fellow Clockmakers, Would a bureau desk work as a clock/watchmaker desk? Not high enough (could be solved) or stable enough? I could fetch one of these from facebook around 30-40 pounds. I like the idea because it would be more or less child and dustproof as you can close and lock the whole thing. Best regards, lui
    • I have a monoprice voxel. It is limited in features compared to others but works out-of-the-box and was a good price. I wouldn't bother with a 3d printer for parts holders and the like. There are a few nice designs on thingiverse but really it isn't worth the bother. Injection molded supplies are going to be better quality and you can buy a bunch all at once instead of one waiting to print them out one at a time. Where it may come in handy is when you need something in a specific shape that you cannot buy. But keep in mind you will need to learn at least some basic CAD design. I use Moi3d which is excellent but there are cheaper alternatives. I've used my 3d printer to create different adapters and holders where I needed an exact shape. For example, I was bending a strip of brass and was able to create plastic bending clamps I compressed with some pliers. I was able to figure out the exact inside and outside curve I needed and print to match. The nice thing about the 3d printed parts is you can use glue to attach whatever you need to it without worrying about having to damage the print when removing it as you can always print a new one.
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