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szbalogh

Watch magnetism and demagnetizer

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Very interesting and very useful. I can't find the specific one you show in the video, but I found a different EMF app (free so maybe quality is questionable) just now and tried it out on my watches. I am seeing that anything metal is causing some kind of signal change, albeit weak. Any suggestions as you seem to have yours dialed in to the point it doesn't move at all when the watch is put near the compass. 

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Maybe I am not properly using my demagnetizer. It's just a cheap Chinese version. I begin with the object at a distance, turn the magnet on, slowly being the item into the magnetic field until it starts to buzz then slowly remove the item until it's an arms length away from the mag. Either way I ran a few tests and maybe you can help me interpret. So first off here is just a spring bar tool that I had laying around that came with a strap recently:

3ff8a3e10f1eb9030f3f44f638d8a70d.jpg

I then magnetized it using my mag and got:

51161d62b4f8eb049a61abd8b3af2620.jpg

Then followed the procedure that I spoke of at the beginning to demagnetize. My reading afterwards was slightly lower magnitude than before but still noticeable:

1c1d2524eb432e2382e1091365df9b91.jpg

And then comes a watch that I just demagnetized following the exact same procedures that appeared to work for the spring bar tool, but repeated 2 times in 2 different directions.

34cdb963dccc78f07dd7e5712155808c.jpg

I am afraid maybe you are right and that my demagnetizer is too weak to demagnetize the whole watch all at once. And that I will haves to demag each part individually. Appreciate any feedback you can lend.


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Thanks for showing this, 

I have a question though , if the watch was demagnitser two months ago Im  wondering why it is magnetic now ?

I know it's a little off subject but it is relevent. 

Thanks Tom

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3 hours ago, NMarsh said:

 Appreciate any feedback you can lend.

Yes it seems to me that the demagnetizer You have is strong enough for the spring bar remover but not strong enough for a whole watch.

3 hours ago, thessler said:

I have a question though , if the watch was demagnitser two months ago Im  wondering why it is magnetic now ?

The answer is in the description. I am working with a strong magnet at my workplace :)

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3 hours ago, szbalogh said:

Yes it seems to me that the demagnetizer You have is strong enough for the spring bar remover but not strong enough for a whole watch.

I appreciate it. I will have to try and demag the movement itself and see if that helps, if not I guess I will being doing it by each individual part. 

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On 2017. 01. 26. at 8:06 PM, NMarsh said:

I appreciate it. I will have to try and demag the movement itself and see if that helps, if not I guess I will being doing it by each individual part. 

Demagnetization is recommended part by part :)

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Maybe I am not properly using my demagnetizer. It's just a cheap Chinese version. I begin with the object at a distance, turn the magnet on, slowly being the item into the magnetic field until it starts to buzz then slowly remove the item until it's an arms length away from the mag. Either way I ran a few tests and maybe you can help me interpret. So first off here is just a spring bar tool that I had laying around that came with a strap recently:

3ff8a3e10f1eb9030f3f44f638d8a70d.jpg

I then magnetized it using my mag and got:

51161d62b4f8eb049a61abd8b3af2620.jpg

Then followed the procedure that I spoke of at the beginning to demagnetize. My reading afterwards was slightly lower magnitude than before but still noticeable:

1c1d2524eb432e2382e1091365df9b91.jpg

And then comes a watch that I just demagnetized following the exact same procedures that appeared to work for the spring bar tool, but repeated 2 times in 2 different directions.

34cdb963dccc78f07dd7e5712155808c.jpg

I am afraid maybe you are right and that my demagnetizer is too weak to demagnetize the whole watch all at once. And that I will haves to demag each part individually. Appreciate any feedback you can lend.


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What is the app you are using?


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What is the app you are using?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro


It is Teslameter pro on the iPhone. It says it's a "metal detector" but I assume that it can serve the same purpose with maybe just a small amount of static.

245c7830f1a19df8223e826b2f0b4d4d.jpg




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