Jump to content
szbalogh

Watch magnetism and demagnetizer

Recommended Posts

Very interesting and very useful. I can't find the specific one you show in the video, but I found a different EMF app (free so maybe quality is questionable) just now and tried it out on my watches. I am seeing that anything metal is causing some kind of signal change, albeit weak. Any suggestions as you seem to have yours dialed in to the point it doesn't move at all when the watch is put near the compass. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I am not properly using my demagnetizer. It's just a cheap Chinese version. I begin with the object at a distance, turn the magnet on, slowly being the item into the magnetic field until it starts to buzz then slowly remove the item until it's an arms length away from the mag. Either way I ran a few tests and maybe you can help me interpret. So first off here is just a spring bar tool that I had laying around that came with a strap recently:

3ff8a3e10f1eb9030f3f44f638d8a70d.jpg

I then magnetized it using my mag and got:

51161d62b4f8eb049a61abd8b3af2620.jpg

Then followed the procedure that I spoke of at the beginning to demagnetize. My reading afterwards was slightly lower magnitude than before but still noticeable:

1c1d2524eb432e2382e1091365df9b91.jpg

And then comes a watch that I just demagnetized following the exact same procedures that appeared to work for the spring bar tool, but repeated 2 times in 2 different directions.

34cdb963dccc78f07dd7e5712155808c.jpg

I am afraid maybe you are right and that my demagnetizer is too weak to demagnetize the whole watch all at once. And that I will haves to demag each part individually. Appreciate any feedback you can lend.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for showing this, 

I have a question though , if the watch was demagnitser two months ago Im  wondering why it is magnetic now ?

I know it's a little off subject but it is relevent. 

Thanks Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, NMarsh said:

 Appreciate any feedback you can lend.

Yes it seems to me that the demagnetizer You have is strong enough for the spring bar remover but not strong enough for a whole watch.

3 hours ago, thessler said:

I have a question though , if the watch was demagnitser two months ago Im  wondering why it is magnetic now ?

The answer is in the description. I am working with a strong magnet at my workplace :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, szbalogh said:

Yes it seems to me that the demagnetizer You have is strong enough for the spring bar remover but not strong enough for a whole watch.

I appreciate it. I will have to try and demag the movement itself and see if that helps, if not I guess I will being doing it by each individual part. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2017. 01. 26. at 8:06 PM, NMarsh said:

I appreciate it. I will have to try and demag the movement itself and see if that helps, if not I guess I will being doing it by each individual part. 

Demagnetization is recommended part by part :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe I am not properly using my demagnetizer. It's just a cheap Chinese version. I begin with the object at a distance, turn the magnet on, slowly being the item into the magnetic field until it starts to buzz then slowly remove the item until it's an arms length away from the mag. Either way I ran a few tests and maybe you can help me interpret. So first off here is just a spring bar tool that I had laying around that came with a strap recently:

3ff8a3e10f1eb9030f3f44f638d8a70d.jpg

I then magnetized it using my mag and got:

51161d62b4f8eb049a61abd8b3af2620.jpg

Then followed the procedure that I spoke of at the beginning to demagnetize. My reading afterwards was slightly lower magnitude than before but still noticeable:

1c1d2524eb432e2382e1091365df9b91.jpg

And then comes a watch that I just demagnetized following the exact same procedures that appeared to work for the spring bar tool, but repeated 2 times in 2 different directions.

34cdb963dccc78f07dd7e5712155808c.jpg

I am afraid maybe you are right and that my demagnetizer is too weak to demagnetize the whole watch all at once. And that I will haves to demag each part individually. Appreciate any feedback you can lend.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


What is the app you are using?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the app you are using?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro


It is Teslameter pro on the iPhone. It says it's a "metal detector" but I assume that it can serve the same purpose with maybe just a small amount of static.

245c7830f1a19df8223e826b2f0b4d4d.jpg




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Welcome Dan  I too have many hobbies but love the watch and clock aspects but flyfish when time and weather allow plus fly tying , gardening and Diy  plenty to do
    • Hi Dan, Welcome to the forum.
    • A soak in diesel fuel, naphta for day or two,  ends the old story of heads popping off the screws. I remove balance cock pallets and soak the rest, give one dip in a fluid I can stand the odor of. Any cheap multipurpose oil would do. I use several solutions, detergent seperately and brush extesively.  
    • Hello forum folks, I've been tinkering with watches for maybe 5 years now. I'm very much a beginner but I have been practicing on cheap watches and movements that it is ok to break. I've managed to make my own watch dial from a brass sheet, including brushing, rhodium plating, printing, and creating applied markers and numerals. I've also made a "smart" watch using epoxy-based putty for the case and my electronics knowledge. I have some basic skills in metal finishing including polishing and plating. So I've mostly worked on the non-movement aspects of watchmaking and am interested into learning about servicing movements. I live in the Milwaukee area and was thrilled to see MATC (local trade school) on lists of schools that teach watchmaking -- just to have that dashed when I contacted them and the class has been discontinued for lack of interest  So for now, I have online and book resources to learn. I have a mostly cheap watch collection other than a Longines that I treasure. I have a few different old timex mechanicals I got off of ebay, including 2 from JerseyMo which I saw is on this forum. I have have way more hobbies than time so I'll probably be around off and on. Dan
    • First thing would be to remove the pinions. They are sometimes quite well rivetted, so this may involve turning away some of the rivet or being willing to sacrifice the wheel (it could easily be distorted beyond use in punching the pinion out). Then you need to compare the hole in the wheel you want to use to the diameter on the pinion that will be pressed and rivetted in. If too big it gets tricky, you'll need to sleeve/bush the hole very securely. I would open the hole further, then chamfer both sides, make the bush with an undersized hole, then fit it in. Swage the bush with a convex punch in the hole from both sides, then a flat punch that is larger than the bush. The idea is to deform metal into the two chamfers on the wheel. Finally flatten and clean up. Now open the hole to receive the pinion. If the hole is too small it's easy, just open it up and press/rivett the pinion in.
×
×
  • Create New...