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I've got another one! Help PLease?


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I've come across this Ingersoll and am struggling.

It is in a backless case - the only access is via the front glass.  I have pulled the crown as hard as I am willing and this does not separate.

The watch winds, ticks and stops, so I'd like to get a look at the mechanism.  Can anyone help?

Also, the only Ingersolls I've come-across are Triumphs, this is not so marked.  Can anyone help with a model or age?

Thank you all!

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I'm sure the back comes off with a good case knife and the movement drops out because the so call d stem is a different fitting to other pocket watches, I had to repair loads of these little blighters as an apprentice, I was serving my time back it the 70's but this style goes way way back I think to the early 50's, yours is a later model as its got s/s

Smiths did them as well.

Edited by oldhippy
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Hi again Oldhippy, thanks for the response!

I'm sorry but, if there is a rear-opening, I cannot see it and it is a far better fit than the front-opening?  I have tried to capture the issue on camera but it's not easy on a bright, shiny surface.

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18 hours ago, rodabod said:

If it's a "negative set" movement then there will be no stem release as such since the stem will be captive in the case.

I'd possibly also try tapping it onto the desk in case the movement starts to hinge outwards (coming out at "6" due to hinging near the stem at "12"). Just a guess.

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6 hours ago, rodabod said:

I'd possibly also try tapping it onto the desk in case the movement starts to hinge outwards (coming out at "6" due to hinging near the stem at "12"). Just a guess.

Thank you for the new option - I have never seen what you describe and am interested in investigating.

With the front removed the mechanism is very free in the case and can be encouraged forwards as you describe.  However, after a couple of mm it does come to a definite stop, suggesting either a stiff hinge, or no hinge.  How much pressure would I have to apply if there were a hinge?

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3 hours ago, 94marconi said:

I have a T Eaton pocket watch with a high polish case and the back screws off. When screwed on the joint is almost invisible. Sterling silver case mind. 

I am sure that possibility has been explored...

Ron

 

Like Rodabod's answer, this one intrigues me too.  I haven't tried unscrewing the back and I am skeptical that the join on this particular case could be that invisible.

I am at work now but will certainly give both answers a good try! 

The ONLY reason I've not yet popped the hands off to release the face yet is that my (slightly-arthritic) meat-hooks have such trouble getting the beggars back on.  Is there a specific tool that'd make this easier?

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The ONLY reason I've not yet popped the hands off to release the face yet is that my (slightly-arthritic) meat-hooks have such trouble getting the beggars back on.  Is there a specific tool that'd make this easier?

Yes there are tools to help but manually removing and setting hands is a skill which you must acquire otherwise you can't work with watches, what about practicing? Keep the watch close, use good magnification, lay the elbows on the bench and try to be relaxed.
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4 hours ago, jdm said:
6 hours ago, Hullblazer said:

The ONLY reason I've not yet popped the hands off to release the face yet is that my (slightly-arthritic) meat-hooks have such trouble getting the beggars back on.  Is there a specific tool that'd make this easier?

 

Yes there are tools to help but manually removing and setting hands is a skill which you must acquire otherwise you can't work with watches, what about practicing? Keep the watch close, use good magnification, lay the elbows on the bench and try to be relaxed.

I have some scrappers, I should get down to it I know.  Failure is frustrating but it's practice I need.

 

Back does not unscrew.

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15 minutes ago, rodabod said:

Can you scroll down to the section on "setting" on this page and try to figure out if yours is "negative set"? You may be able to tell depending on how the time is set; do you push the crown in or pull it...

http://www.vintagewatchstraps.com/watchmovement.php

It is, if I'm reading right, a positive set: winding occurs with the crown in situ and the crown is pulled up/out to set the hands.  

I have given a firm pull in order to check for a separating stem and I am confident that it does not.

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