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That's T V for you. One of the things I used to do was look at the clocks to see if they were working, I also found many times a clock would be in a seen and would chime or strike but the sound it would give out was nothing like the clock. :DI haven't had a T V in my home for about 12  to 15 years.

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LOL! Nice one - I spotted this too!

I can only think that the 'runner' on the production team had been told to get a couple of watch case openers and the director liked the look of the sturdy and butch looking bench mounted snap-on case opener rather than the flimsy jaxa style that had been obtained - to heck with accuracy!

What was potentially interesting though is that they managed to track down the identify of the victim because he had had his inexpensive watch serviced twice and the servicing watchmaker had scratched the dates and his name on the inside of the case. Is this common practice on a service?

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8 hours ago, oldhippy said:

That's T V for you. One of the things I used to do was look at the clocks to see if they were working, I also found many times a clock would be in a seen and would chime or strike but the sound it would give out was nothing like the clock. :DI haven't had a T V in my home for about 12  to 15 years.

Recommend You to watch "The time machine" 1960 :) Lots of nice clocks in that movie. 

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On 1/6/2017 at 10:39 AM, WatchMaker said:

LOL! Nice one - I spotted this too!

I can only think that the 'runner' on the production team had been told to get a couple of watch case openers and the director liked the look of the sturdy and butch looking bench mounted snap-on case opener rather than the flimsy jaxa style that had been obtained - to heck with accuracy!

What was potentially interesting though is that they managed to track down the identify of the victim because he had had his inexpensive watch serviced twice and the servicing watchmaker had scratched the dates and his name on the inside of the case. Is this common practice on a service?

My father was a watchmaker for 60 years and when he did a major overhaul on a watch, he would, in tiny print, scratch his initials and a ticket number inside the case.  He recorded the ticket number in a book and included all the information regarding the watch (make, model, material etc), it's owner, what service was performed on it and what he charged.  I have those books. As a matter of fact, I have recorded some of the information in them.  That was one of the jobs I would do when I worked for him in my younger days.   He used different tickets if he just changed a crystal or stem and crown or something minor.  The information from those tickets was recorded in  different books (with less information) and the ticket number was not scratched into the watch case for those.  Of course, most of the watches he worked on were not luxury watches.  A big percent of them were railroad watches.  He was a railroad watch inspector for Southern Pacific and Missouri Pacific railroads for many years. 

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oldhippy

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That's T V for you. One of the things I used to do was look at the clocks to see if they were working, I also found many times a clock would be in a seen and would chime or strike but the sound it would give out was nothing  like the clock. :DI haven't had a T V in my home for about 12  to 15 yea

I'll 'ditto' that last comment above about giving up the tv.

I did that a few years ago.

It's nothing more than a constant repeat of things that you've already seen  before.

Why do people find it necessary to watch the same films and programmes over and over and over again?

And, of course, you have to pay the BBC (Biased Broadcasting Company) an

outlandish fee to do so, so that they can waste millions of your  pounds, giving it to the same  ubiquitous celebrities.

 

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oldhippy

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That's T V for you. One of the things I used to do was look at the clocks to see if they were working, I also found many times a clock would be in a seen and would chime or strike but the sound it would give out was nothing  like the clock. :DI haven't had a T V in my home for about 12  to 15 yea

I'll 'ditto' that last comment above about giving up the tv.

I did that a few years ago.

It's nothing more than a constant repeat of things that you've already seen  before.

Why do people find it necessary to watch the same films and programmes over and over and over again?

And, of course, you have to pay the BBC (Biased Broadcasting Company) an

outlandish fee to do so, so that they can waste millions of your  pounds, giving it to the same  ubiquitous celebrities.

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