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54 minutes ago, ArtNalika said:

Hi

I have a Braun watch like this , It's out of battery

http://www.braun-clocks.com/watches/gents-bn0095-prestige-chronograph-watch-with-stainless-steel-bracelet.html

How to open it to change a battery or service ?

Thanks

The instruction manual offers no direct method of changing the battery despite being in several languages.. There is the part that implicates am involved method of getting to the inside:

For servicing and repairs, the removal of the access screw on the back of the watch gives access to the stem release-catch; after removal of the crown and stem, pressured air is inserted to blow-out the crystal. Thereafter, the entire movement, together with the dial and hands are easily removed from the top. Experienced watchmakers with the necessary equipment should only perform this operation and the removal of the access-screw by any other persons without the required expertise is highly discouraged.

 

 

Unfortunately, this is the way to change the battery. If you look up how to un-case an Omega Seamaster Cosmic 2000, you may find some people mention using pressurized air to pop the crystal out and remove the movement to replace the crystal. I must add that I do not have experience with this particular Braun watch, but if its a ronda chrono quartz, it must have a battery; and changing that battery is of course part of the servicing mentioned in the instruction manual. Its gonna be tricky, but hopefully you'll hear from some others on this site---by the way WELCOME!!

 

J

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I think J is correct it is a front loader & the screw on the case back is to release the stem. however a bit of a worry if the stem does not go back. I have written to Braun on the off chance they give a service manual & I have also asked where their recommended service centres are.

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1 hour ago, oldhippy said:

Why the hell do idiots design such things. They certainly don't think of the watchmaker who will have to replace the battery.:pulling-hair-out: 

As a way of ensuring continued revenue forcing people to have to send it back to the official agent for a battery and seal change at a £100 a pop. An annoying trend now a days.

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1 hour ago, wls1971 said:

As a way of ensuring continued revenue forcing people to have to send it back to the official agent for a battery and seal change at a £100 a pop. An annoying trend now a days.

Agreed on this account, one should consider service when buying any product, especially a watch! IMHO the Germans tend to over engineer things, not a bad thing, just something to consider. Who knew Braun made watches?

 

2 hours ago, oldhippy said:

Why the hell do idiots design such things. They certainly don't think of the watchmaker who will have to replace the battery.:pulling-hair-out: 

The same as auto designers who apparently never had to clean an interior or replace a simple part!

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It's an interesting comparison, when I buy a car I can see a list of prices for servicing from the dealer I make  an informed choice on purchase by factoring in those costs, and with some manufactures designing cars that require the complete removal of the front bumper to change a bulb, I chose not to buy from that manufacturer.

When I bought my first Swiss watch brand new in 1990, an Omega Speedmaster one of the first questions I asked was how much would a service be for the watch I seem to remember the price as being £115.00 at the time or a fifth of the cost of the watch. Omega only serviced it under warranty and made a complete hash of it, in fact to such a degree they replaced the watch under warranty after that my local watchmaker got my patronage when it required a service.

I have only used omega to service one other watch I owned and that was a 18ct constellation which went in for a service and refinish that came to £135.00 in 1993 and they did a superb job.

Many people just wont bother to ask about servicing and would be stung at a later date it would be interesting and useful if agents where forced by law to show current manufacturer recommended service intervals and battery change  or servicing costs next to the price of the watch in the window display or at least to be displayed in any brochure the manufacture prints.

Edited by wls1971
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On ‎12‎/‎25‎/‎2016 at 11:19 PM, ArtNalika said:

Hi

I have a Braun watch like this , It's out of battery

http://www.braun-clocks.com/watches/gents-bn0095-prestige-chronograph-watch-with-stainless-steel-bracelet.html

How to open it to change a battery or service ?

Thanks

I can't help you with service/batt replace, Where did you acquire watch? Is there a local watch shop or jeweler around your location you can take for opinion. Just from looking on back, the smaller screws appear to hold strap, or maybe they also hold back on watch, so that just leaves the larger screw, which I can't imagine what it would do besides hold the back on, (I am just guessing and do not advise you remove or try to) I would feel terrible if something got broken!

Seek a professional opinion and let us know, because now I am curios and really would like to know.

Nice watch BTW.

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Undo the screw on the back, remove the crown/stem, replace the screw, then use a manual balloon pump (very inexpensive from most greeting card shops) to pop off the crystal. Best to place the watch into a zip bag first, then poke a hole where the crown is, place nozzle of balloon pump over the case tube and give it a couple of very quick pumps and the glass should pop off. This is how i do the front loading omegas. Will probably help to get someone to help hold the watch while you pump.

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So found a review for the watch looks like solid case design Crystal has to come off to get inside. But this kind a crystal looks like from the picture there may be a nylon ring which is typically used to hold the crystals in place. This means you're going to need a crystal press to put the crystal back on and hopefully not damage the nylon ring.

Second link confirmation of what we learned above how to blow the crystal off.

http://www.ablogtowatch.com/braun-bn0095-watch-review/

Then Somebody else claims to have the answer

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I wrote to Braun asking how to open this watch & this is the reply I received today:

 

Dear Mr *****,
 
Thank you for your email regarding your uncles Braun Prestige Watch.
 
We recommend all Prestige Watches are returned to our service address below for all repairs including battery replacements.  (battery replacement cost is £39.00)
 
The Braun Service Centre
Unit 1 & 2 Phoenix Park
Apsley Way
London
NW2 7LN
 
Kind regards,
 
Linda Lawrance | Service Centre Manager
Zeon Ltd, Units 1 & 2 Phoenix Park
Apsley Way, London, NW2 7LN
T: +44 (0) 203 828 8426
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35 minutes ago, clockboy said:

I wrote to Braun asking how to open this watch & this is the reply I received today:

 

Dear Mr *****,
 
Thank you for your email regarding your uncles Braun Prestige Watch.
 
We recommend all Prestige Watches are returned to our service address below for all repairs including battery replacements.  (battery replacement cost is £39.00)
 
The Braun Service Centre
Unit 1 & 2 Phoenix Park
Apsley Way
London
NW2 7LN
 
Kind regards,
 
Linda Lawrance | Service Centre Manager
Zeon Ltd, Units 1 & 2 Phoenix Park
Apsley Way, London, NW2 7LN
T: +44 (0) 203 828 8426

This sounds familiar to other Luminox service question and trend to return to "service center" for service, 39P for a batt? I only wish I could charge that!:startle:

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Wow.  I think most watches of this design are destined to spend their later years in the back of a dresser drawer.  I really can't see how this would ever go over well with one's clientele.

I'll add that I really do hate built in obsolescence.

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  • 5 years later...
On 12/26/2016 at 3:24 PM, WileyDave said:

IMHO the Germans tend to over engineer things, not a bad thing, just something to consider. Who knew Braun made watches?

I'm not so sure who to blame here. Braun doesn't really make watches, they are made by Zeon Ltd. under license. The design of this watch is credited also to Braun Design and Studio Hannes Wettstein AG, so no idea who did the engineering there, though I would assume that was up to Zeon. Moreover, it seems they were only made in Germany durin 2013-14 and ever since they have been made in China. Which to me, makes the latter models slightly overpriced.

Now, if anyone has had any luck opening this watch, please do let me know. I have tried applying pressure in the stem whole with a siringe as this video suggests. I even though of heating up the case with a heatgun hoping that thermal expansion would loosen the cristal. So far, no joy anywhere.

 

 

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