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Welcome to new members from the Moderators

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On behalf of "Watch Repair Talk" moderators, I would like to extend a warm welcome to all new members.  

This is a friendly place with plenty of knowledgeable people who have varying degrees of horological expertise, the great thing is they are willing to share that invaluable knowledge and help one another.

To help us keep things running smoothly, I would ask all new members to read the forum rules and place their posts in the correct sections.

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thanks for welcome. I am an amateur watch restorer/repairer since 60 years. But never too old to learn a few tricks so I hope to learn from the community. What an asset to new watchmakers to have all this data available at a few clicks. I remember many hours standing behind a watchmaker to see what he did and learn, but slowly. But although I (with experience under my belt) appreciate the easy info, i would like to stress to young people to remain eager to go and do! There is no substitute your fingers to learn what to, and how to do it. And that comes at a price, real costs but also the famous sweat and tears.

I am dutch, live in france and consider english my best language.

 

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Hello from Orange County, California!

Thank you for creating this site. I have been watching Mark's videos on YouTube for quite some time and I appreciate what you are doing for those of us that are intrigued by mechanical watches. I have had a fascination with pocket watches since a very young age and I love watching your service and repair videos, especially vintage watches of all types.

I look forward to learning from this community, and meeting other people from around the world that share my interest and fascination with mechanical watches. 

Cheers!

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New member but I have been viewing most of the You Tube video's by Mark Lovick which helped me fix my first Seiko watch and since have done minor repair on several watches and gaining on watch tools. It started as a curiosity and now its a beginning hobby with buying more old watches on eBay and repairing them, or I should say attempting to repair them. Only issue I have is the old vintage watches are so f#*%^ small, I have a hard time setting the gear train wheels in their proper places. It takes a steady hand, which I don't have, and eye strain that gives me a headache. So stopping every 15 minutes and resting helps but then I forgot which parts goes where!  Damn, getting old is not for wusses. Mark makes everything look so easy but setting the impulse jewel into position for the pallet fork has me pulling my hair out, and not much left. Any secrete or video advising the best or easiest way to do it, would sure be appreciated.

Thank you,

Rob

 

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Hello from Connecticut/USA

I've tinkered with old clocks for years and have always wanted to move into watches. I've followed the Watch Repair Channel and now feel encouraged to make the first step. 

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Hello, very happy to have found a site such as this. I have not had much luck finding people as interested as I have been in them until now. I am amatuer at my knowledge but not from a desire to learn more about them.  I should ask if this is for people that collect, service key winde clocks? I have collected a few and all old. I recently acquired an anitque french carriage clock.  I havent even figured out who makes it but my gut rells me its french.  Lots to do with it but mainly cleaning as much a I can tell from the outside.  Problem is the door will not open and is like it isiezed.  It does have alot of brass thats tarnished. The door has a small knob to open/close and nothing on the other side that latches or anything.  I have tried a bit of thin oil, mild heat,pulling untill I got nervous but no luck.  It is so tight there really isnt a seam to try wedge it open plus I dont want to damage it. I appreciate any advice on ways I could do it.  I was going to try lifting case off to get better access but not sure how to do it.  Never had a clock like this but always wanted one.  Last owner said door has been stuck as long as she remembered (65 years) so I expect some work.   Is this site for people that dont work on watches more than clocks? Just want be sure Im in the right place for me? Thankyou all 

 

Hello from Connecticut/USA

I've tinkered with old clocks for years and have always wanted to move into watches. I've followed the Watch Repair Channel and now feel encouraged to make the first step. 

!

 

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Hello,

Great luck to come across this forum, what a treasure. Have been a toolmaker for many years, and am always in aw at the precision of time keeping instruments. Having been around and involved in the building of precision tools, I am amazed at that which is and was achieved with tools from an era when so much skill and knowledge is required from the craftsman. I  know that much of todays fine time instrument production  relies on silicon tech, but when the 1s and 0s are lost, this mechanical  method tics away.

I want to learn and share.

Tinker

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On 14/05/2017 at 3:27 PM, 1daniel said:

Hello from Connecticut/USA

I've tinkered with old clocks for years and have always wanted to move into watches. I've followed the Watch Repair Channel and now feel encouraged to make the first step. 

Welcome Daniel, Enjoy the forum but be warned this horology can become addictive. 

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Thank you for your warm welcome to the forum. I hope here I will find answers to my most pressing questions, and help with a repair, overhaul or build. I have been casing mechanicals for a few years now, using mostly ETA movements and specializing in the 7750 chronograph. So far I have built over 10 watches with a variety of cases and strap styles. I really enjoy Mark's videos and I hope they will help me improve my technique and give me more confidence when working on expensive movements.

 

 

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Thank you for your welcome and letting me introduce myself.

I am retired and spending my time in Sweden during summertime and moving to Thailand during the winter in order to not having to move a lot of snow, which some months or weeks later just melts away by itself. My hobbies since long have been gold washing and cutting precious stones and also to some extent trying to understand electronics in order to be able to repair and build amplifiers.

Now I have the intention to get some know-how about clocks and watches enabling me get som old peaces wake up and get going again.

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welcome to the load of new members!   remember; even if you are [or were] a heavy equipment, [driver or mech. or both];  the chances of losing any fingers on watch repair,  are slight.  vin

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Hi All,

I've been mesmerised by Mark's videos too and love to dabble. I've been collecting tools and love fixing things. The elegance and ingenuity of horology is addictive. I've got a few projects on the go, a dead quartz longines, a live ronda-movement watch that requires a screw-down crown and some kit watches that just need to go together. Great information from you professionals out there, please keep it coming!

I am active on watchuseek with the same username.

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