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    • By Bill3
      I am working on an Elgin pocket watch grade 312.  It was an estate sale purchase and was not running when purchased.  I assumed that it was not running because it was very dirty and thought cleaning would solve all the problems.  I completely disassembled it and ran it through an ultrasound cleaner and rinse. It came out bright and shiny and when I started to reassemble for the first time I saw that there was NO roller jewel!  
      So, what now? Can the roller jewel be replaced by a person with very modest ability?  I am including two pictures of the balance and roller plate.  I do not see any sign of where it was attached.  
      Thanks in advance for any guidance.  
      Bill H.


    • By eccentric59
      I'm as green as they come and need a scrap movement for practice. I scored this on an eBay auction for $0.99 (+ $4.99 shipping, LOL) First inspection shows it not in terrible condition. The balance and escapement move at least, but it doesn't wind (very stiff) and the keyless works are either rusted fast or broken (the stem does not move in or out). I'll be taking this very slowly, since it's educational more than anything else.
       
      Please note the high quality cardboard case ring. 
       

    • By east3rn
      Hello.
      I am now working on a vintage "trench watch" movement from 1910s that I mentioned before with a question regarding identification of the movement.
      (I still haven't got the exact ref. of the movement.)
      As I was disassembling the movement, my screwdriver slipped and broke one of the parts that function as a spring for the click.
      I tried looking for replacement but I am not sure what I should look for.
      Also, one of the jewels on the  wheel bridge is broken so I need a jewel as well. 
      Could anyone advice me on how to find the correct part for click spring and the jewel for the wheel bridge??
      **Could the click spring be put back together??
      Thanks. You are always of great help.





    • By trevsdad
      I'd like to try my hand at converting a vintage pocket into a wristwatch.
      For anyone who knows, what size pocket watch should I aim for and what's the best source for an appropriate sized case? Is a 'Hunter' best for this? What's the best solution for a winding stem and if I have to go with a case that's not drilled for the stem, what's the best solution?
      In other words, what best practice for this mod?? Any help would be appreciated.
      thanks
    • By Dave84
      Hi Everyone 
      I hope you are all well. 
      It has been 12 months or so since I last logged in, and shamefully about the same since I pulled out my box of old watches. I was browsing the 'Bay' as always and really liked the look of this Waltham Traveler. I picked it up for less than £10 and would like to use it as my first restoration project. I have undertaken minor repairs in the past but nothing like this, I hope I haven't bitten off more than I can chew. 
      I need to find a key to see if it winds & runs, repair/service it and source the hands and a case, which is uncharted territory for me and I'm not sure how easily they are sized / sourced.
      Any help, advice or pointers that you guys may be useful to me will be greatly received
      Many thanks in advance 
      Dave  
       
       
       



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    • right you are,  the simple "multimeter"  is not sensitive,  presisign, enough  for electronics.     I can't remember the one that was.  i'll drag the one out that is.   also,  accutron  had a special meter for that mvt.  (I have one  of  those too).   ALSO;  I think we have a eleictronics engineer in this forum?   OH - how I hate eleictronics  !    vin
    • As ANdyHull says there are many different type. I use the powdered type from Cousins, which is basically 'fine rust in a jar'  
    • https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_nkw=jewelers+rouge&_sop=15 It comes in many varieties, and many forms. Fundamentally it is rust (or to be more precise iron III oxide), often suspended in wax or other soft medium, or simply in graded powder from. It has been used for centuries to polish precious metals as it is a relatively soft abrasive.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron(III)_oxide The term "jewelers rouge" is also sometimes used in a more generic form, to indicate any form of jewelers polishing compound, so I've seen people referring to "green rouge" polishing compound etc.
    • What dose that jewelers rouge look like, is this the commercial name for it. I have been using denture polishing compound on a tooth pick,. ey.  not bad.    TIA  
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