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    • By east3rn
      Hello.
      I am now working on a vintage "trench watch" movement from 1910s that I mentioned before with a question regarding identification of the movement.
      (I still haven't got the exact ref. of the movement.)
      As I was disassembling the movement, my screwdriver slipped and broke one of the parts that function as a spring for the click.
      I tried looking for replacement but I am not sure what I should look for.
      Also, one of the jewels on the  wheel bridge is broken so I need a jewel as well. 
      Could anyone advice me on how to find the correct part for click spring and the jewel for the wheel bridge??
      **Could the click spring be put back together??
      Thanks. You are always of great help.





    • By trevsdad
      I'd like to try my hand at converting a vintage pocket into a wristwatch.
      For anyone who knows, what size pocket watch should I aim for and what's the best source for an appropriate sized case? Is a 'Hunter' best for this? What's the best solution for a winding stem and if I have to go with a case that's not drilled for the stem, what's the best solution?
      In other words, what best practice for this mod?? Any help would be appreciated.
      thanks
    • By Dave84
      Hi Everyone 
      I hope you are all well. 
      It has been 12 months or so since I last logged in, and shamefully about the same since I pulled out my box of old watches. I was browsing the 'Bay' as always and really liked the look of this Waltham Traveler. I picked it up for less than £10 and would like to use it as my first restoration project. I have undertaken minor repairs in the past but nothing like this, I hope I haven't bitten off more than I can chew. 
      I need to find a key to see if it winds & runs, repair/service it and source the hands and a case, which is uncharted territory for me and I'm not sure how easily they are sized / sourced.
      Any help, advice or pointers that you guys may be useful to me will be greatly received
      Many thanks in advance 
      Dave  
       
       
       



    • By AdamC
      It's been a while since I've worked on a movement as old as this. A friend asked me to look at whether I could get his great-grandmother's watch working again. When I first saw it, I thought it was an old 1920's ladies wristwatch, though thought it odd that the winding stem is at 12. However, on closer examination, it resembles more of an old pocket watch movement. Now amazingly, the watch is ticking when wound but I cannot pull the stem to set the hands. On removing the dial, I can see the yoke and yoke spring on the opposite side. But would I be right in thinking that it is missing the setting lever? There is a space that looks suspiciously like there could have been a setting lever there once but I could be wrong.
      I'd also be interested to hear your opinions on the age of the movement. I'm thinking around 1900.
      What's more surprising is that when the case is closed, you don't see the chipped porcelain around the edges, so thick is the bevel. It looks so nice and ornate and when the case is closed. Would love to be able repair but have my doubts.
      Any ideas about the keyless works?
      Thanks in advance.



    • By kmcderm133
      So, while waiting to fix the Seiko misadventures of my youth, I went looking for broken pocket watch movements on ebay. (I had read somewhere that a good way to start is clocks for their larger parts, then pocket watches as an intermediate stage and then wristwatches for the smallest movements and parts.) After losing several auctions for promising non-working pocket watches I found a New York Standard possibly "Model 11". It was mostly disassembled and there is much rust/corrosion. I think it's missing at least the clutch, for example. It needs new hands, but this isn't impossible. The main problem here is the rust. It looks like someone disassembled this watch on purpose but I don't know how it came to be so rusted. (Maybe it was parted out? It would be nice to have a tech book on this watch.) 
      So I've been looking over rust removal methods. One video says to use water and baking soda with a brush. Many advocate the use of a "solvent" without being very specific. I have a .pdf of a 1940's War Dept. Technical Manual for watch repair. (you know, for when you're in a trench and taking fire and need to know what time it is but your watch is broken) Among other things this book recommends using pith and I think maybe pegwood as well as solvents or the like that are only referred to by what I think are military requisition numbers.
       My circumstances are such that I can't afford a sonic jewelry cleaner, and I don't have a dedicated work area and limited storage for tools. The baking soda method appeals to me but I think this works mostly by abrasion, the baking soda being gritty. I'm afraid this could damage smaller parts. I could upload pictures if anyone's interested. 
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