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How Do You Fit A Vintage Omega Seamaster Crystal?


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Hi all,

 

I'm new to the forum and am sure I'll be learning a lot.

 

I recently purchased an old Omega Seamaster from a well known auction site. I took a bit of a gamble, it looked in a right old state with a cracked crystal, broken bracelet, covered in crud and with a slightly pitted dial.

 

The reason I purchased it was I have never owned an Omega and always wanted an older style that could be restored. This one looked as if it had never or hardly ever been opened, and thus serviced.

 

It has a 562 movement housed in a 166.003 case and with a crosshair dial.

 

In taking the back off, the gasket was an off white colour and as hard as rock, it must have been the original. The movement initially looked to be clean but the rotor does need attention - to be expected I suppose as the watch is from 1966 according to the serial number.

 

I've removed the old gasket, the easiest way was to pop out the crystal first, just used my thumbs for that, then I warmed up the case in hot water for about ten minutes, this softened the gasket enough to insert an old screwdriver to carefully remove the gasket in sections.

 

I removed the steel bezel using a razor blade and gently pushing the blade between the bezel and case and using a rotating action, it popped off nicely. Lots of crud under that.

 

I've given the case an ultrasonic clean and light polish ready to receive a new crystal.

 

My question is this:

 

I have sourced from Cousins a new crystal, PZ1543L, for the 166.003 case. Is this to be inserted with a press tool or by using the crystal lift/insert type?

 

 

 

 

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post-236-0-07401400-1402481312_thumb.jpg

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Welcome to the forum Systeman.

That will be a nice watch once refurbished. Regarding the crystal, if it has a tension ring inside the perimeter of the lens then it will have to be pressed in, if the crystal is plain and does not have a tension ring use a crystal lift to compress it for fitting.

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Thanks Lee, I practiced a few times with a cheapo crystal before finally fitting the Omega genuine one. I wasn't sure if the correct procedure was to fit it without the steel bezel in situ or removed. I took some measurements and decided to fit it with the bezel removed, pressing the bezel in place afterwards.

 

Because the bezel is slightly larger than the crystal, I think the only purpose it serves on this Seamaster version is to serve as a crystal alignment guide and to protect the crystal edge because of its height.

 

It would be nice to know which way up the Omega symbol should be. On the PZ5143L one I fitted it was inverted, i.e. date lense at 3pm - Omega logo inverted. Does it matter?

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Thanks Lee, I practiced a few times with a cheapo crystal before finally fitting the Omega genuine one. I wasn't sure if the correct procedure was to fit it without the steel bezel in situ or removed. I took some measurements and decided to fit it with the bezel removed, pressing the bezel in place afterwards.

 

Because the bezel is slightly larger than the crystal, I think the only purpose it serves on this Seamaster version is to serve as a crystal alignment guide and to protect the crystal edge because of its height.

 

It would be nice to know which way up the Omega symbol should be. On the PZ5143L one I fitted it was inverted, i.e. date lense at 3pm - Omega logo inverted. Does it matter?

 

By crystal alignment guide I mean if the bezel is in situ before fitting the crystal.

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Thanks Lee, I practiced a few times with a cheapo crystal before finally fitting the Omega genuine one. I wasn't sure if the correct procedure was to fit it without the steel bezel in situ or removed. I took some measurements and decided to fit it with the bezel removed, pressing the bezel in place afterwards.

 

Because the bezel is slightly larger than the crystal, I think the only purpose it serves on this Seamaster version is to serve as a crystal alignment guide and to protect the crystal edge because of its height.

 

It would be nice to know which way up the Omega symbol should be. On the PZ5143L one I fitted it was inverted, i.e. date lense at 3pm - Omega logo inverted. Does it matter?

The logo in the crystal could be either way. I have seen all directions. They are random stamped? As long as it is there . BTW that is a very nice looking watch. 

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The crystal should,in my opinion, be fitted so that it is in the same orientation as the logo on the dial.

 

It makes no difference really which way it goes as you only see it if you're looking for it but I can't believe that in the old days a company like Omega would allow watches to go out with their logo upside down.

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systeman - you've just done what i've been wanting to do for a while. i want to get an old omega and refurbish it. i love omega watches. it's almost a grail for me.

you've done a real nice job on yours. you should be proud - and you should be wearing it every day. lol.

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The crystal should,in my opinion, be fitted so that it is in the same orientation as the logo on the dial.

 

It makes no difference really which way it goes as you only see it if you're looking for it but I can't believe that in the old days a company like Omega would allow watches to go out with their logo upside down.

Agree. It has to be fitted properly or you might as well forget it. There's a right way and there's a wrong way

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