Jump to content

Recommended Posts

The first blade is for sure not shapened with a hollow shape, but it has a to hardened tip with brittle metal, one can se it flaking away which isn't good.
In my book to get a really nice surface one can use both of these sharpeners with the horotech style one just must get it to fit good in the toolholder.
Swisstech makes a similar one with a bunch of inserts so you always will get the perfect result, and fast, but always with quality the price is a downside. Sharpener.thumb.jpg.7710fee293899b0365a2466524b7face.jpg

A screwdriver with a softer tip, like the one below made of berylium is almost impossible to get perfect without a good sharpening tool.

Gold_Tip.thumb.jpg.6e12fa76bdd7a0ca7ee5d83010eb1efa.jpg

And in the end it's like with racing with cars, a good car will take you a long way but it's the man behind the screwdriver that makes the difference ;)

Edited by HSL
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 185
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I spent the day literally watching paint dry. I was using black lacquer to fill in the engraving on a pocket watch case to make it stand out. I will send pictures when it is finished. In the mean

This should put your mind at rest. Click on this link. http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/sdriver/sdriver.html  

Like others on here I don't restrict myself to just one set of screw drivers. I have one set ground to a thinner profile, and another set ground to a slightly fatter profile. I also have numerous scre

Posted Images

To me, the OP blade are not hollow ground.

As such he'll not need to buy an expensive tool like that at this stage of the learning process.

Regards

NAD


Sent from my moto g(6) play using Tapatalk

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/15/2020 at 5:08 PM, nad said:

To me, the OP blade are not hollow ground.

As such he'll not need to buy an expensive tool like that at this stage of the learning process.

 

blade.jpg.21076a2e3d924b5cd2e34d78c7981da5.jpg

 

Now do you see the hollow? I didn't suggest that OP should buy the "expensive" tool But that when sharpening on a stone he would have to remove the hollow and that it would be better to use a new (cheap) blade. Please read the original post before posting negative comment.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My friend, I see nothing negative about my comments.

If the observation that I, and others have made, that the OP blades are not hollow ground are at odds with your view, then it doesn't make it a negative comment.

I politely request that you just agree to disagree and draw this thread to a conclusion.

Sent from my moto g(6) play using Tapatalk

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎5‎/‎13‎/‎2020 at 1:34 AM, Watcher said:

Your blades have been hollow ground on a tool like this.

sdt.jpg.f5d679d25c565adf29658fe60743a33c.jpg

If you use the tool illustrated by nad you will have to flatten each side of the tip. You should replace the blades or buy the hollow ground sharpener.

    good show

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

The best way I found to sharpen  screwdriver tips is to use a sharpening fixture. They are relatively inexpensive and will precisely hold an angle. Watches are easy to damage due to the small size of the parts.and having the correct tools can greatly reduce the chance of damage.  Of course there is always the exceptional genius who can repair anything with a broken hacksaw blade and a potato scraper but reality favors having the correct tools. 

david 

Edited by david
removed a superfluous word
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, david said:

The best way I found to sharpen  screwdriver tips is to use a sharpening fixture. 

I think that a rolling fixture is useful only when making the blade from a blank. Othewise two strokes per side on an aluminum oxide do for me. I let the flat guide itself  and slide in one direction only. . Of course the smaller the driver the less tactile feedback.I hqve one screwdriver holder with an embedded oxide strip and find it extremely handy. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 11 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • So, i received some distilled water today and cleaned a watch with it, and now the parts are all clean and shiny, no more whitish deposit. Im very happy with the result. These old Elma machines are really rock solid and do a pretty damn job, still after 50 years 🙂
    • Actually I checked here: https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/silicone-chemical-resistance-d_1879.html It lists silicone as "not resistant" to petroleum ether. Is this incorrect in practice? For rubber, I think i confused benzene with benzine. My mistake.
    • Mine would be the usual Timex bought in the late 60's, it lasted a few years and was probably my first attempt at a watch stripdown, as I tended to strip everything down in those days ;), can't remember if it was dead before the stripdown, it was afterwards and consigned to the bin shortly thereafter. Paul
    • Thank you.  My son is now taking an interest too so he may be the one to deal with the movement while I set about repairing the case.  He seems to have a photographic memory when it comes to taking things apart and putting them back together.  Proved that when he was 4 years old and was given an Airfix type model as a Christmas gift.  It was quite a complicated model, way above his age range but he got fed up waiting for his father to help him with it so did it himself.  It was a landing craft model with a lot of very small pieces.  He couldn't even read properly at the time.  His father told him to take it apart and put it back together again so he did - without looking at the diagrams.  Wind on 30 years later and he's still the same.  The PC he's got, he built himself. Who knows.  This could be the start of something good.
×
×
  • Create New...