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I spent the day literally watching paint dry. I was using black lacquer to fill in the engraving on a pocket watch case to make it stand out. I will send pictures when it is finished. In the mean

This should put your mind at rest. Click on this link. http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/sdriver/sdriver.html  

Like others on here I don't restrict myself to just one set of screw drivers. I have one set ground to a thinner profile, and another set ground to a slightly fatter profile. I also have numerous scre

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1 minute ago, jguitron said:

Looks great!!!

Can you show a pic 90 degrees to the one you took?

I couldn’t open the vid. Maybe a Tapatalk issue?


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Hi Jguitron,

 

Sure, here you go, I didn't sharpen like a knife, the tip will be too fragile.

 

Darak

 

 

399FC59E-429F-414C-A257-12EE588B5E1F.jpeg

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Hi Jguitron,

 

Lansky is known for its easy sharpening system, it’s not challenging at all to sharpen either a screwdriver bit or knife with this kit and I can reproduce the results consistently, you can see the video that I post, I can view the video via the phone, just need to wait, or view it on a PC.

 

The screwdrivers that I fixed today are 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2 mm, all come out beautifully, but I need to say, using the Lansky kit are more fiddly, you need to take out the bit from the handle, fix it on the Lansky jig and sharpen it, versus a screwdriver sharpening kit(sharpening stone and screwdriver roller), but the Lansky kit comes with a lot of different stones of your choice and you can sharpen your knife with it.

 

For my use, because I’m just a hobbies, I don't need to sharpen my screwdriver that often, so the Lansky works great for me, if this hobby become more serious, means need to sharpen them every day, I might buy a professional screwdriver sharpening set, with a lot of different stones.

 

Darak

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I'm not familiar with the tool you are using, but it looks like it is giving good results.

Screwdrivers are more forgiving than knives with shapening, to sharpen my screwdreivers I purchased a 240 grit and 400 grit diamond sharpening plate off ebay for just $3 or $4 each and have one an A&F spring loaded screwdriver holder for sharpening and find that gives me pretty good results.

The most important thing is using your Loupe to check you have inserted the screwdriver correctly before sharpening.

Also if you are removing a chip on the blade you will normally have to hold the blade at 90 degrees to the diamond plate and take a small amount off the end so they screwdriver blade once sharpened to ensure it doesn't bottom out in the screw.

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  miniture screw drivers can be nicely "by eye".   it is not "an art",  but the result of a machinest's  apprentiship.   twist drills can aso sharpened "by eye".  i will admit the small ones can be dificult ---- practice.   vin

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I tend to just use my "metric calibrated eye",  ;) and of course files/fine grit paper.

You can use one of these, If your eye requires a little more precise calibration. 

s-l500.jpg

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_nkw=2.5mm+metal+Watch+Screwdriver+Sharpener+Sharpen+Watchmaker+Repair&_sop=15 

They do work, but you will still end up finishing by hand/eye with good magnification, and obviously they only work with straight blades, so not much use for drill sharpening or cross headed drivers.

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19 hours ago, Darak said:

My nice Bergeon screwdriver set was chipped after few watch services,

I recall a fairly recent topic which where some was saying that Bergeon screwdriver had become worse and worse with time. We got the proof here. 

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3 hours ago, AndyHull said:

They do work, but you will still end up finishing by hand/eye with good magnification, and obviously they only work with straight blades, so not much use for drill sharpening or cross headed drivers.

Sharpening is a science and an industry. Trivia facts follow

Drill_Point_Geometry_nt.pdf

Edited by jdm
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  • 3 months later...

In school we uses this one, also to make hollow blades on a screw driver.

 

https://www.beco-technic.com/werkzeuge-verbrauchsartikel/schraubendreher/zubehoer-fuer-schraubendreher/schleifwerkzeug-fuer-schraubendreherklingen/schleifwerkzeug-profi-fuer-schraubendreherklingen.html

 

But is very expansive.

 

This one is cheaper, but don't know if you can use it on al screwdrivers from the Bergeon set, because it only have 3 holders.

 

https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/screwdriver-sharpener-tool-horotec

 

But this is wat you really need:

 

209445_4_3.jpg.c5076ef26f6e7fd03f7f084641b50624.jpg

Edited by Koen
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On 10/3/2018 at 2:57 PM, Tmuir said:

Hollow ground screwdrivers are really only of use if you work on the same model of watch all the time.

The reason is if your flat ground screwdriver is too thin you just stone a tiny bit off the end to make it fatter.

On a hollow ground screwdriver you need to remove a lot more material to make it fatter, and then hollow grind it again to suit the screw you want to undo, so its harder to swap between brands of watches that you need to adjust your screwdrivers for.

If you worked as an 'in house' watch repairer of an expensive brand of watches, and always did the same movements then hollow ground is the best, but for most of us that works on what ever watch comes our way the flat ground is best being a compromise between time taken to reshape screwedrivers and the risk to 'chewing' screws.

I agree. From what I know, The British Horological Institute and watchmaker schools in the Netherlands teach to work on watches with flat ground screwdrivers.

Hollow ground is useful for screws made of a softer metal such as gold and convex screws that you sometimes see in older watches and also sometimes used as case screws.

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Well because with hollow screwdrivers, you have more grip the teacher say ( Omega service center ) and les chance to slip away or to damage screws...

 

You don't want to damage movements, especially now with open case backs. But thats what we learn the first lesson, I am only the pianist. ;-)

 

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I have never heard such tommy rot. I well dressed screw driver blade and the correct size for the screw and you need a steady hand is all that is needed. The more expansive screwdrivers have a easier rotation in the fingers then cheap ones.   

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1 hour ago, Koen said:

Well because with hollow screwdrivers, you have more grip the teacher say ( Omega service center ) and les chance to slip away or to damage screws...

See above the good postings by Tmuir and measuretwice. Parallel blades drivers aren't given that much importance, for whatever the right and wrong reasons. Good that you are being exposed to comparison at school so you can base your own judgment, I want to do the same. 

Edited by jdm
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Well because with hollow screwdrivers, you have more grip the teacher say ( Omega service center ) and les chance to slip away or to damage screws...
 
You don't want to damage movements, especially now with open case backs. But thats what we learn the first lesson, I am only the pianist. ;-)
 

What is a hollow screwdriver?

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I also find it odd to immediately have everyone's screwdrivers hollowed. 

A friend of mine is also an Omega certified watchmaker but has never used a parallel blade in his life. The same goes for Anthony from NoBSwatchmaker, who's certified for Rolex, Breitling, JLC, and Omega.

No doubt that parallel blades are useful in some cases but it sounds like a personal thing from the teacher.

*edit The great George Daniels was also all about flat ground screwdrivers.

Edited by Nutiborskoku
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Like I say, I am only the pianist.

But hey every body will have there thought about something... Only time will tell my experience... but for now I am a rookie and just follow the pack. ;-)

But I can understand the point that hollow blades fit better in the screws and so you wont damage them.

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Like I say, I am only the pianist.
But hey every body will have there thought about something... Only time will tell my experience... but for now I am a rookie and just follow the pack. ;-)
But I can understand the point that hollow blades fit better in the screws and so you wont damage them.

Again, what is a hollow blade


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31 minutes ago, Nutiborskoku said:

I also find it odd to immediately have everyone's screwdrivers hollowed.

Quite normal in watchmaking schools, one have to do a lot of filing and tool making before undertaking actual horology subjects.

Good for building dexterity and machinist skills but really there is whole lot more than that to make, at least, a good repairer. 

 

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